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Neda Maghbouleh speaks to CTV on Islamophobia in Canada

Professor Neda Maghbouleh is a faculty member at the University of Toronto, Mississauga who specializes in race, racism and immigration. She spoke today on CTV in the wake of the shooting in a Quebec City mosque on Sunday, January 29th. Watch the interview here

Black and Blue: Akwasi Owusu-Bempah in U of T Magazine

Professor Akwasi Owusu-Bempah is a faculty member at the University of Toronto, Mississauga with expertise in the area of race and policing. U of T Magazine featured an interview with him in the Winter 2017 edition. The entire interview is available here and includes a link to the TEDxUofT talk that Owusu-Bempah and Scot Wortley, … Read More

Jooyoung Lee speaks on CBC Regina about gun amnesties

Jooyoung Lee is a faculty member at the University of Toronto, teaching at the St. George Campus. His research focuses on gun violence. On January 26, Professor Jooyoung Lee joined host Sheila Coles and Regina police chief Evan Bray in a discussion about gun amnesties on the Morning Edition, a Regina CBC radio program. Watch … Read More

Akwasi Owusu-Bempah in Spacing Toronto on Pride and Black Lives Matter

Professor Akwasi Owusu-Bempah is a faculty member at the University of Toronto, Mississauga with expertise in the area of race and policing. This piece, written with Mariana Valverde of the Centre for Criminology, was published in Spacing Magazine on January 25, 2017. The complete piece is available online The following is an excerpt of the … Read More

Professor Jooyoung Lee talks guns on Pulse 107.7

Professor Jooyoung Lee recently spoke with Kash Heed on 107.7 Pulse FM talking about gun violence, mental health and the victims of crime. Pulse 107.7 is a radio station located in the Fraser Valley in British Columbia. The Kash Heed show is a public affairs morning show. Professor Jooyoung Lee teaches sociology and criminology at … Read More

Just how much do book prizes matter?

Book prizes play a monumental role in contemporary literary culture. Not only do they boost sales for winning and short-listed authors, they also help to define what is seen as “quality” in literature. If the effects of the prize are long lasting, book prize judges wield a tremendous amount of power over culture and literary … Read More

Ping-Chun Hsiung’s “Lives and Legacies”provides interactive instruction in qualitative interviewing

Teaching the skills needed for qualitative interviewing poses particular challenges. Students need to learn how to frame and ask questions, how to practice reflexivity, and how to analyze interview data. Such skills cannot be learned simply by reading about them in a textbook. Recognizing that practice provides the best way to learn the skills involved … Read More

“What if I don’t take my meds?” Amy Klassen’s research has the answer

Congratulations to Doctoral Candidate Amy Lynn Klassen who recently published an article about the governance of non-compliant psychiatric patients under the law, and its implications for understanding capability and risk. She thanks SSHRC for funding the research that resulted in this publication. The full article is currently behind a paywall. For those with access, it … Read More

Scott Schieman on BNN: rethinking work-life balance

Professor Scott Schieman was recently interviewed by the Business News Network on a segment about Work-Life Balance. In the segment, Professor Schieman draws on findings from his CIHR-funded national study into work-life stress among Canadians. Professor Schieman is currently the Chair of the St. George Campus Department of Sociology and he is a Canada Research … Read More

Congratulations to Kim Pernell, recipient of 2016 Richard J. Hernstein Prize

Congratulations to Professor Kim Pernell whose PhD dissertation was recently awarded the Richard J. Herrnstein Prize from Harvard University. Professor Pernell finished her dissertation in the spring of 2016 before joining us at the University of Toronto (St. George) this summer. The Richard J. Herrnstein Prize is awarded annually by the Graduate School of Arts … Read More

From Science: Twas the Night before grant deadline

This appeared in Science on Dec. 21, 2016. Maybe I’ll make a Canadianized and social science appropriate version for next year. If I can find a rhyme for SSHRC… ‘Twas the night before grant deadline By Adam RubenDec. 21, 2016 , 12:30 PM ‘Twas the night before grant deadline, 7:15. Many creatures were stirring, thanks … Read More

Does Diversity Work?

UTM Sociology Professor Ellen Berrey was recently profiled on the UTM Research News page. The full story is available on their website. We have pasted the beginning of the piece here: Does ‘diversity’ work? Assistant Professor Ellen Berrey Wednesday, December 14, 2016 – 2:31pm The concept of diversity has been celebrated and supported at major … Read More

Disability and the Trump Administration

Professor David Pettinicchio is a faculty member at the University of Toronto, Mississauga with expertise in the area of political sociology and social policy and particular research interests in the area of policy and disability. He currently has a SSHRC-funded research project investigating employer discrimination against persons with disabilities. He recently published an editorial piece … Read More

Nathan Innocente profiled in UTM Medium

Professor Nathan Innocente is an Assistant Professor (Teaching Stream) of Sociology and teaches at the Mississauga undergraduate campus. He was recently profiled in the Medium, UTM’s student newspaper. The full article is available on the Medium’s website. Here’s a short excerpt: The face behind the popular SOC100 Sociology assistant professor Nathan Innocente’s current research focuses … Read More

Congratulations to Ito Peng, CRC in Global Social Policy

Congratulations to Professor Peng, named Canada Research Chair in Global Social Policy This honour recognizes Professor Peng’s academic achievements and her contributions to the emerging field of global social policy. The Canada Research Chair program recognizes scholars in Canada who are “outstanding, world-class researchers whose accomplishments have made a major impact in their fields,” who … Read More

Including all voices in political deliberation

Imagine a political discussion that involves in-depth reasoned discussion and has the potential to move people with entrenched positions to considering alternative viewpoints. In light of the recent US election, such a scenario might seem utopian. Even so, participation in political communication is one of the cornerstones of democracy. Robust democratic involvement asks that citizens … Read More

Around the World with a U of T Sociology PhD

We’ve had 263 PhD graduates since 1978. About a quarter of these find employment outside of the academy. The 170 others are employed in tenure track positions in universities around the world. Home is Canada The vast majority of our PhD alumni (72%) are or have been employed in Canadian Universities. In fact,  every Canadian … Read More

P2P: Authentic, Exotic and Racialized Food

Every student in the Sociology PhD program at the University of Toronto completes the Research Practicum course in their second year. This course involves each student working directly on a research project with a faculty member through the various stages of research and writing while also meeting with other graduate students in the course to … Read More

Habit and the Body

Congratulations to Doctoral Candidate Athena Engman and Professor Cynthia Cranford who recently published an article on the role of physical capacity in habit formation. Thanks to SSHRC for funding the research that resulted in this publication. The article was recently highlighted by the American Sociological Association as a journal highlight when it appeared earlier this … Read More

S.W. Underwood on campus radio

Sociology graduate student S.W. Underwood recently spoke on the CIUT radio show We Are U of T about trans organizing at U of T. The interview begins at minute 7.40