S.D. Clark Symposium on the Future of Canadian Society

“I have wanted to look at what is wrong with society as well as what is right; to look at the way old established structures  of a society broke down as well as the way new structures came into being. In a word, the interest has been in the problem of change rather than in the problem of order.”
– S.D. Clark

S.D. Clark was the first chair of the Department of Sociology at the University of Toronto and a key figure in establishing the discipline of sociology in Canada.  The S.D. Clark Symposium on the Future of Canadian Society honours his memory by bringing together top social scientists both from the University of Toronto and elsewhere around the world to discuss issues of importance for Canada. The 2017 S.D. Clark Symposium on the Future of Canadian Society will be the third annual symposium. The Proceedings of the previous symposia have been published by Rock’s Mills Press and are available for purchase using the attached order form or online at the Rock’s Mill Press website.

2015: Inequality and the Future of Canadian Society

S.D. Clark, the first chair of the Department of Sociology at the University of Toronto, was one of Canada’s leading sociologists in the middle years of the twentieth century. Late in his career, he conducted research on how economic change in Canada resulted in inequality as reflected in patterns of residential segregation. The First S.D. Clark Symposium picked up where Clark left off by focusing on income inequality and its implications. Contributors include Robert Andersen, Lars Osberg, Ito Peng, Gordon Cleveland, John Myles, and Emily Laxer, with Robert Brym’s introduction providing an overview of the subject. View poster of the 2015 event.

2016: Immigration and the Future of Canadian Society

“A spectre is haunting Europe and the United States—the spectre of immigration.” So begins Robert Brym’s introduction to the second volume of proceedings of the annual S.D. Clark Symposium. Contributors Richard Alba, Jeffrey G. Reitz, Naomi Lightman, Monica Boyd, Patricia Landolt, and Salina Abji consider the social and political effects and implications of immigration, both from a comparative perspective and with a specific focus on the Canadian experience in the early years of the twenty-first century. The result is a thought-provoking examination of one of the most important issues of our time. View poster of the 2016 event.

2017: The Future of Canada’s Territorial Borders and Personal Boundaries

November 10, 2017, 9:30 am – 3:30 pm
East Common Room, Hart House, The University of Toronto

Canadian identity, governmentality, and security are affected by both the permeability and the strengthening of national borders and personal boundaries. In this symposium, leading figures in the study of borders and boundaries—sociologists, political scientists, and geographers—analyze and debate the contested Arctic, the securitization of the Canada/U.S. border, and the Internet’s threat to personal sovereignty. Participants include John Hannigan, Ron Deibart, Heather Nicol, Klaus Dodds, Alison Mountz, and Emily Gilbert. View poster of the 2017 event.

9:30 Refreshments

10:-00 “Opening Remarks,” Robert Brym, SD Clark Chair, Sociology, U of T

Morning Session: 10.15 – 12.00

“Bordered Futures in a Borderless World,” John Hannigan, Sociology, U of T

“The Cyber-world and its Boundaries,” Ron Deibert, Political Science, Munk School of Global Affairs, U of T

Discussant: Heather Nicol, Geography, Trent University

Afternoon Session: 1.30 – 3.30

“Contesting Borders in the Arctic,” Klaus Dodds, Geopolitics, Royal Holloway, University of London

“Securitization along the Canada-US Border,” Alison Mountz, Geography, Balsillie School of International Affairs, Wilfrid Laurier University

Discussant: Emily Gilbert, Canadian Studies and Geography, U of T

The event is free and all are welcome to attend; however registration (here) is required. For more information and accessibility assistance, contact anna.slavina@mail.utoronto.ca.