Flaws with the 2016 Census: Professor Robert Brym in Globe and Mail

Robert BrymSociology Professor Robert Brym recently authored an op-ed piece for the Globe and Mail Newspaper. His op-ed discusses flaws in the 2016 census methodology that resulted in the apparent decline of Canada’s Jewish population.  Professor Brym is the S.D. Clark Chair in Sociology and teaches at the St. George Campus. His current research interests include the democratization movement in the Middle East and Northern Africa.

We have posted an excerpt of the piece below.

Robert Brym
Nov. 2, 2017

…All was supposed to return to normal when the Trudeau government came to power. Just one day after taking office, it announced that the 2016 census would revert to its traditional, compulsory form, once again providing Canadians with reliable data about their economic, demographic, housing and ethnic status. But at least one category of the population – Canada’s Jews – may be miffed to learn that more than half their number went missing between 2011 and 2016. Statistics Canada reported this “fact” in a recent 2016 census release.

The 2011 NHS reported 309,650 Canadian Jews by ethnic ancestry, which is believable because it is in line with 2006 census data. In contrast, the 2016 census reports just 143,665 Jews by ethnic ancestry – a decline of nearly 54 per cent in five years. That number defies reason.

Read the full piece here.