Congratulations to the 11 PhD graduates of 2016/17

Convocation at Con HallThis year, eleven of our PhD students successfully defended their dissertations and graduated with their doctorates. Follow the careers of our PhD graduates by perusing our PhD alumni page. Congratulations this year go to:

Salina Abji

Salina’s dissertation was Emerging Citizenships: Efforts to Address Violence against Non-Status Women in Toronto and she was supervised by Anna Korteweg (supervisor), Patricia Landolt, and Judith Taylor. Salina is currently a SSHRC postdoctoral fellow at Carleton University. Read more about Salina on her website or here.

Holly Campeau

Holly’s dissertation was Policing in unsettled times: An Analysis of Culture in the Police Organization. She was supervised by Ron Levi (supervisor), Candace Kruttschnitt, and Josée Johnston. Holly will start a new position as Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Alberta this fall. Read more about Holly here.

Steven Cook

Steven’s dissertation was A Comparative Analysis of the Violent Victimization Experiences of Street and School Youth. He was supervised by Julian Tanner (supervisor), David Brownfield, and Scot Wortley (U of T Criminology). Steven is currently a lecturer in quantitative methods and criminology at Cardiff University.

Kim de Laat

Kim’s dissertation was Mesa-Level Influences on Creativity and her committee was Shyon Baumann (supervisor), Vanina Leschziner, and Damian Phillips (Columbia Business School).  Kim is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Gender + the Economy in the Rotman School of Business at the University of Toronto. Read more about Kim on her website.

Jennifer Elrick

Jennifer’s dissertation was Family/Class: State-Based Boundary Work around Immigration and National Identity in Germany and Canada Since 1955. She was supervised by Anna Korteweg (supervisor), Patricia Landolt, and Jeffrey Reitz. Jennifer is currently an Assistant Professor of Sociology at McGill University.

Nathan Innocente

Nathan’s dissertation was Organizational Risk and Mortgage Fraud. He was supervised by Sandy Welsh (supervisor), Ronit Dinovitzer, and Kelly Hannah-Moffat (U of T Criminology). He is currently an Assistant Professor (teaching stream) at the University of Toronto, Mississauga. Read more about Nathan here.

Emily Laxer

Emily wrote her dissertation on Democratic Struggles and the National Identity Formation: The Politics of Secularism in France and Quebec. She completed her degree under the supervision of Anna Korteweg (supervisor), Monica Boyd, and Erik Schneiderhan. Emily is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Diana Miller

Diana’s dissertation was titled Gendering Cultural Fields. She was supervised by Cynthia Cranford (supervisor), Vanina Leschziner, and Bonnie Erickson. Diana works as the Data Analysis Coordinator for York Region. Read more about Diana here.

Joanne Nowak

Joanne’s dissertation was Moving Beyond the Lone Skilled Migrant: Establishing a Social Model of Skilled Migration and Integration Through a Case Study of Ghanaian Nurses. She was supervised by Cynthia Cranford (supervisor), Patricia Landolt, and Monica Boyd. Joanne is the academic coordinator for the Blum Centre at the University of Californa, Santa Barbara.

Agata Piekosz

Agata wrote her dissertation on Polish Catholic Priests in Canada and Ireland: Migration, Leadership, and the Mobility of Strangers. She was supervised by Anna Korteweg and Y. Michal Bodemann (co-supervisor), and Judith Taylor. Agata is currently an instructor at King’s University College.

Siyue Tian

Siyue’s dissertation was Living Arrangements and Intergenerational Supports Among Immigrant and Canadian-born Seniors. She worked under the supervision of Monica Boyd (supervisor), Cynthia Cranford, and Markus Schafer. Siyue is currently an analyst with Statistics Canada.

Cultural Scenes and Political Attitudes

Diana MillerDan SilverCongratulations to Doctoral Candidate Diana Miller and Professor Dan Silver who recently published an article on the importance of spatial cultural scenes for understanding political attitudes. This research benefited from funding from SSHRC. The full article can be accessed here and I include the citation and abstract below.

Diana L. Miller and Daniel Silver (2016) Cultural Scenes and Contextual Effects on Political Attitudes. European Journal of Cultural and Political Sociology: 2 (3-4): 241-266 DOI: 10.1080/23254823.2016.1144480

Spatial variation in voting is well documented, but substantively meaningful explanations of how places shape individuals’ politics are lacking. This paper suggests that local cultural ‘scenes’ exert a contextual effect – a spatial effect not driven by demographic differences between individuals in different places – on political attitudes and sensibilities. We measure the local ‘scene’ of Canadian electoral districts (EDs) through an original, national database of amenities, which we code qualitatively to describe those amenities’ cultural attributes. We combine scenes measures with demographic Census data on each constituency, and individual-level data from a 2011 federal election exit poll. Using hierarchical linear models, we find that individuals’ political sensibilities are correlated with the ED-level cultural context in which they reside, controlling for demographic factors at both levels. We find that EDs with self-expressive scenes are correlated with left-leaning political attitudes, while EDs with locally oriented scenes are correlated with right-leaning political attitudes. We hypothesize that the mechanism underlying these findings is that individuals’ local cultural context subtly shapes their political sensibilities.

 

Gender and the Artist Archetype

Congratulations to Doctoral Candidate Diana Miller who recently published an article that reviews scholarship on gender inequalities among creative and artistic producers. The article is currently behind a paywall but here is the citation and abstract.

Miller, D. L. (2016) Gender and the Artist Archetype: Understanding Gender Inequality in Artistic Careers. Sociology Compass, 10: 119131. doi: 10.1111/soc412350.

Women artists are systematically disadvantaged across cultural fields. Although some of these disadvantages resemble gender inequalities in non-artistic work, such as lower pay, underrepresentation, work–family conflict, and symbolic devaluation, others are unique to artistic careers. In this essay, I extend Acker’s work on the implicit gendering of the ideal-typical worker to show how gender implicitly organizes social expectations around artists and artistic work. I highlight themes emerging from past research on gender relations in artistic careers, which suggest that the ideal-typical artist builds on a masculine model in at least three ways. First, collective understandings of creative genius center a masculine subject. Second, bias in aesthetic evaluations systematically favors men over women. Third, the structure of artistic careers, particularly the need for entrepreneurial labor and self-promotion, requires artists to engage in behaviors that are more socially acceptable in men than in women.