PhD Graduate Marie-Pier Joly on Pregnancy and Birth Cohort Research

PhD Graduate Marie-Pier Joly published an article in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, in collaboration with Professor Michel Boivin (Universite Laval), Professor Anne Junker (UBC), Professor Alan Bocking (UofT), Professor Micheal S. Kramer (McGill), and Professor Stephanie Atkinson (McMaster). The article discusses the creation of an inventory of pregnancy and birth cohort studies that aims to create connections between data and researchers in the field for the benefit of maternal and child health.

Marie-Pier Joly obtained her PhD in Sociology from the University of Toronto in 2017. She is a postdoctoral researcher at Göttingen University studying the experiences of migrants from Muslim-majority countries.

We have posted the citation and the abstract of the article below. The full text is available through the University of Toronto Library Portal here.

Joly, Marie-Pier, Michel Boivin, Anne Junker, Alan Bocking, Micheal S. Kramer, and Stephanie A. Atkinson. 2012. “An Inventory of Canadian Pregnancy and Birth Cohort Studies: Research in Progress.” BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 12:117.

Background

A web-based inventory was developed as a voluntary registry of Canadian pregnancy and birth cohort studies, with the objective to foster collaboration and sharing of research tools among cohort study groups as a means to enrich research in maternal and child health across Canada.

Description

Information on existing birth cohort studies conducted in Canada exclusively or as part of broader international initiatives was accessed by searching the literature in PubMed and PsychInfo databases. Additional studies were identified by enquiring about the research activities of researchers at Canadian universities or working in affiliated hospitals or research centres or institutes. Of the fifty-eight birth cohort studies initially identified, forty-six were incorporated into the inventory if they were of a retrospective and/or prospective longitudinal design and with a minimum of two phases of data collection, with the first period having occurred before, during, or shortly after pregnancy and had an initial study sample size of a minimum of 200 participants.

Information collected from each study was organized into four main categories: basic information, data source and period of collection, exposures, and outcome measures and was coded and entered into an Excel spreadsheet. The information incorporated into the Excel spreadsheet was double checked, completed when necessary, and verified for completeness and accuracy by contacting the principal investigator or research coordinator. All data collected were then uploaded onto the website of the Institute of Human Development Child and Youth Health of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. Subsequently, the database was updated and developed as an online searchable inventory on the website of the Maternal, Infant, Child and Youth Research Network.

Conclusions

This inventory is unique, as it represents detailed information assembled for the first time on a large number of Canadian birth cohort studies. Such information provides a valuable resource for investigators in the planning stages of cohort studies and identifying current research gaps.

Read the full article here.

 

PhD Graduate Marie-Pier Joly on Resaearch & Policy-Making for Migrant Families

PhD Graduate Marie-Pier Joly published an article, in collaboration with Professor Anita Gagnon and Jacqueline Bocking from McGill University, in Health Research and Policy Systems. The article examines research resulting from the Metropolis Project, which began in 1996 in an effort to create a stronger connection between health research and policy-making. The authors specifically analyze what proportion of the project’s research from 1996 to 2006 addressed the ‘priority area’ of immigrant families. They find that some, but not all, of the priority themes were addressed in the research output.

Marie-Pier Joly obtained her PhD in Sociology from the University of Toronto in 2017. She is a postdoctoral researcher at Göttingen University studying the experiences of migrants from Muslim-majority countries.

We have posted the citation and the abstract of the article below. The full text is available through the University of Toronto Library Portal here.

Gagnon, Anita J., Marie-Pier Joly, and Jacqueline Bocking. 2009. “Aligning Research to Meet Policy Objectives for Migrant Families: An Example from Canada.” Health Research and Policy Systems, 7(15).

Background: ‘Evidence-based policy making’ for immigrants is a complicated undertaking. In striving toward this goal, federal Canadian partners created the Metropolis Project in 1995 to optimize a two-way transfer of knowledge (researchers – policy makers) within five Canadian Centres of Excellence focused on migrants newly arrived in Canada. Most recently, Metropolis federal partners, including the Public Health Agency of Canada, defined one of six research priority areas as, immigrant ‘families, children, and youth’. In order to build on previous work in the partnership, we sought to determine what has been studied within this research-policy partnership about immigrant ‘families, children, and youth’ since its inception.

Methods: Annual reports and working papers produced in the five Centres of Excellence between 1996–2006 were culled. Data on academic works were extracted, results coded according to eleven stated federal policy priority themes, and analyzed descriptively.

Results: 139 academic works were reviewed. All federal priority themes, but few specific policy questions were addressed. The greatest volume of policy relevant works were identified for Services (n = 42) and Education and Cultural Identity (n = 39) priority themes.

Conclusion: Research conducted within the last 10 years is available to inform certain, not all, federal policy questions. Greater specificity in federal priorities can be expected to more clearly direct future research within this policy-research partnership.

Read the full article here.

 

PhD Graduate Marie-Pier Joly on Employment Precarity and Immigration

PhD Graduate Marie-Pier Joly, in collaboration with Professor Luin Goldring (York University), published an article in Just Labour: A Canadian Journal of Work and Society. Their article examines how precarious work is affected by legal immigration status and racialization. Joly and Goldring find that employment precarity is much higher for racialized non-citizens.

Marie-Pier Joly obtained her PhD in Sociology from the University of Toronto in 2017. She is a postdoctoral researcher at Göttingen University studying the experiences of migrants from Muslim-majority countries.

We have posted the citation and the abstract of the article below. The full text is available through York University here.

Goldring, Luin and Marie-Pier Joly. 2014. “Immigration, Citizenship, and Racialization at Work: Unpacking Employment Precarity in Southwestern Ontario.” Just Labour: A Canadian Journal of Work and Society, 22:94-121.

This paper examines the relationship between precarious employment, legal status, and racialization. We conceptualize legal status to include the intersections of immigration and citizenship. Using the PEPSO survey data we operationalize three categories of legal status: Canadian born, foreign-born citizens, and foreign-born non-citizens. First we examine whether the character of precarious work varies depending on legal status, and find that it does: Citizenship by birth or naturalization reduces employment precarity across most dimensions and indicators. Next, we ask how legal status intersects with racialization to shape precarious employment. We find that employment precarity is disproportionately high for racialized non-citizens. Becoming a citizen mitigates employment precarity. Time in Canada also reduces precarity, but not for non-citizens. Foreign birth and citizenship acquisition intersect with racialization unevenly: Canadian born racialized groups exhibit higher employment precarity than racialized foreign-born citizens. Our analysis underscores the importance of including legal status in intersectional analyses of social inequality.

Read the full article here.

PhD Graduate Marie-Pier Joly and Professor Blair Wheaton on the Impact of Armed Conflict on the Mental Health of Migrants to Canada

PhD Graduate Marie-Pier Joly and Professor Blair Wheaton published an article in Society and Mental Health. The article assesses the impact of armed conflict in country of origin on mental health in migrants to Canada. Joly and Wheaton examine variation in stress to understand differences in mental health between those who experienced conflict and those who did not, as well as between men and women within each category.

Marie-Pier Joly obtained her PhD in Sociology from the University of Toronto in 2017. She is a postdoctoral researcher at Göttingen University studying the experiences of migrants from Muslim-majority countries. Blair Wheaton is a Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto and his current research examines the role of neighbourhood effects on mental health outcomes.

We have posted the citation and the abstract of the article below. The full text is available through the University of Toronto Library Portal here.

Joly, Marie-Pier and Blair Wheaton. 2014. “The Impact of Armed Conflict in the Country of Origin on Mental Health after Migration to Canada.” Society and Mental Health, 5(2):86-105.

This article examines mental health differences among migrants who emigrated from both armed conflict countries and non–conflict countries versus native-born Canadians. We propose that the impact of armed conflict on mental health depends on defining characteristics of the conflict. Our analysis of migrants to Toronto, Canada, suggests that exposure to major intrastate conflicts have long-term impacts on depression among women and anxiety levels among men after migration. We assess the role of different stages and types of stress proliferation in explaining these differences. Postmigratory chronic stress helps explain differences in depression between migrant women who experienced conflict and both those who did not and Canadian-born women. Conversely, traumatic stress that occurred during the ongoing armed conflict at time of migration helped explain differences in anxiety between migrant men exposed to conflict and both migrant men not exposed and Canadian-born men.

Read the full article here.

Recent PhD graduate Marie-Pier Joly to begin Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Göttingen

Congratulations to Marie-Pier Joly who will begin a postdoctoral research position at the University of Göttingen in August. Marie-Pier defended her dissertation,  Contexts of Exit and the Mental Health and Economic Incorporation of Migrants in Canada, earlier this summer under the supervision of Blair Wheaton, Patricia Landolt (co-supervisors) and Jeff Reitz. The thesis abstract is as follows:

My dissertation explores the impact of contexts of exit on the mental health and economic incorporation of migrants living in Canada, with a specific emphasis on the impact of armed conflicts and human rights violations in countries of origin. The first paper in my dissertation explores the impact of armed conflict according to varying defining characteristics such as severity of the conflict and intra- vs. inter-state focus and finds that migrants from countries with severe intrastate conflict have worse mental health than migrants from countries with no to minor armed conflict and the native-born. The impact of armed conflicts differs by gender, with women experiencing more depressive symptoms and men experiencing more anxiety symptoms. The second paper shows that the impact of armed conflicts is similar to, but does not replace, the impact of human rights violations in countries of origin. The impact of human rights violations is not more pronounced in situations of armed conflicts, and on its own, human rights violations have essentially similar long-term impact on the mental health of migrants as armed conflicts. Each of the first two papers demonstrates that armed conflicts and human rights violations in countries of origin often provoke multiple stressful life events and conditions during the life span that can have cumulative mental health consequences for migrants. The last paper in my dissertation explores the employment and occupational status of migrants from armed conflict countries. It finds that in spite of their high levels of education in Canada, migrants from armed conflict countries experience more difficulties in finding employment, particularly in the early years after migration, and in general achieve lower levels of occupational status, given their education, relative to other migrants and the native-born. When migrants come from countries in conflict, there appears to be an additional discount applied to their job market options after migration. Specifically, education completed prior to migration translates less often into employment success in this group.

At the University of Göttingen, Marie-Pier will study the impact of armed conflict on the mental health of migrants from Muslim-majority countries who live in Canada, the United States, France and Germany. In this project, she will consider the simultaneous impact of variation in the existence of internal conflicts in countries of origin with variation in the context of reception. While there, Marie-Pier will also contribute to a collaborative research project conducting survey research on new migrants and refugees in Germany.