U of T Sociologists at the 2019 ASA

This year, 71 faculty members graduate students from Sociology at the University of Toronto are participating in the Annual Meeting of the American Sociology Association in New York City. In addition to the people presenting papers, a number of our community are also participating as session organizers, discussants or journal editorial panel members. The meetings happen between August 10th and August 13th. We have listed the papers we’re presenting below by the day of the presentation, with student and recent grad presenters shown in italics. Please refer to the ASA Program for complete information.

Saturday, August 10th

Ellen Berrey, U.S. Universities’ Responses to Hate Speech Incidents and Free Speech Politics and the Implications for Inclusion Policy

Yvonne Daoleuxay, The Most Canadian Neighborhood Ever: Social Disciplining and Driving in the Greater Toronto Area

Ethan Fosse and Jason Settels, Population-Level Variability of Happiness Trends in the United States

Chris Kohut, Unanticipated Gains in Homeless Shelters: A Study Examining the Social Networks of the Homeless Population

Ron Levi (with Holly Campeau of U of Alberta and Todd Foglesong of U of T, Munk School), Legality, Recognition, and the Bind of Legal Cynicism: Experiences of Policing During an Unsettled Time

Matthew Parbst, Gender Equality, Family Policy and the Convergence of the Gender Gap in Depression

Kristin Plys, Politics and Poetics in Lahore’s Pak Tea House during the Zia Military Dictatorship (1977-1988)

Markus Schafer (with Matthew Andersson of Baylor University), Looking Homeward with the Life Course: Early Origins of Adulthood Dwelling Satisfaction?

Sunday, August 11th

Philip Badawy and Scott Schieman, When Family Calls: How Gender, Money, and Care Shape the Family Contact and Family-to-Work Conflict Relationship

Irene Boeckman, Work-Family Policies and Working Hours’ Differences Within Couples After Childbirth

Lei Chai and Scott Schieman (with Alex Bierman of U of Calgary) Financial Strain and Psychological Distress: The Mediating Effect of Work-Family Interface

Clayton Childress, Shyon Baumann, Jean-Francois Nault (and Craig M. Rowlings from Duke University), From Omnivore to Snob: The Social Positions of Taste Between and Within Music Genres

Ethan Fosse (with Fabian T. Pfesser of U of Michigan), Bounding Analyses of Mobility Effects

Susila Gurusami, Carceral Complicities: Holding Institutions of Higher Education Accountable for Our Carceral Crises

Julia Ingenfeld, Parents’ Division of Housework and Mothers’ Labor Force Participation: Result of Selection and Assortative Mating?

Jonathan Kauenhowen, Framing Indigeneity: A comparative analysis of Indigenous representation in mainstream and Indigenous newspapers

Yangsook Kim, Doing Care Work in Korea Town: Korean In-Home Supportive Service Workers in Los Angeles

Kim de Laat, De-stigmatizing flexible work arrangements: The promises and pitfalls of buy-in from ideal working fathers

Chang Zhe Lin, Social Capital, Islam, and Labor Force Outcomes: Explaining Labor Force Outcomes among Muslim Immigrants in France

Martin Lukk, Fracturing the Imagined Community: Income Inequality and Ethno-nationalism in Affluent Democracies

David Pettinicchio and Jordan Foster, A Model Who Looks Like Me: Representing Disability in the Fashion Industry

Ashley Rubin, Target Populations or Caught in the Net: How Race and Gender have Structured Prison Reform Efforts Throughout American History and What it Means for Reforming Mass Incarceration

Ioana Sendroiu, Imagination, from Futures to Failures

Sarah Shah, Gendering Religious Reflexivity in Minority Groups: The Case of Pakistani Canadian Muslims

Michelle Pannor Silver, Embodiment and Athletic Identity

Lawrence Williams, How Career Identity Shapes the Meaning of Work for Referred Employees

Dana Wray, The Causal Effect of Paternity Leave on Fathers’ Responsibility for Children

Monday, August 12th

Katelin Albert, “The decision was made for me. I’m okay with that”: HPV Vaccine and Adolescent Girls’ Selves

Monica Boyd and Shawn Perron, The Vietnamese Boat People in Canada: 30 Years Later

Gordon Brett, The Embodied Dimensions of Creativity

Soli Dubash, “My House Is Your House”: Genre Conventions, Myspace Musicians, and Music Genre Self-Identification

M. Omar Faruque, Privatizing Nature: Resource Development and Nationalist Imaginaries in Bangladesh

Fernando A. Calderon Figueroa,Trust thy Neighbour, but Leave Up the Hedges: Trust in the Urban Scene

Vanina Leschziner, The Specter of Schemas: Uncovering the Meanings and Uses of “Schemas” in Sociology

Patricia Louie, Race, Skin Tone and Health Inequality in the U.S.

Neda Maghbouleh, Anti-Muslim Racism and the ‘MENA’ Box: Expulsions and Escapes from Whiteness

Gabriel Menard, Latent Framing Opportunities for Movements and Counter-movements: The US Network Neutrality Debate, 2005-2015

Sebastien Parker, ‘Both roads lead to Rome’: Pathways towards commitment in a far-right organization

Kim Pernell, Imprinting a Risky Logic: Graduate Business Education and Bank Risk-Taking

Sagi Ramaj, The Homeownership Attainment of LGB Immigrants: The Role of Social Relationships

Jeffrey Reitz (with Emily Laxer of York U and Patrick Simon of INED), National immigration ‘models,’ social welfare regimes, and Muslims’ economic incorporation in France and Canada

Ioana Sendroiu and Andreea Mogosanu, Stigma spillover and beyond: Resistance, appropriation, and counter-narratives in stigmatized consumption

Tahseen Shams, The Precariousness of South Asian Muslim Americans: Geopolitics, Islamophobia, and the Model Minority Myth

Lance Stewart, The Judgment of Objects: The Constitution of Affordances through the Perceptual Judgment of Digital Media

Laura Upenieks, Reassembling the Radius: Trust and Marginality across East-Central Europe

Tuesday, August 13th

Milos Brocic, Higher Education and the Development of Moral Foundations

Jerry Flores (with Janelle Hawes of U Washington-Tacoma and Kati Barahona-Lopes of UC, Santa Cruz), What are the challenges of girls in involved in the foster care and juvenile justice system?

Ethan Fosse (with Christopher Winship of Harvard University), Bias Formulas for Mechanism-Based Models: A General Strategy for Estimating Age-Period-Cohort Effects

Angelina Grigoryeva, An Organizational Approach to Financial Risk-Taking: The Role of Firm Compensation Plans

Cinthya J. Guzman, Rethinking Boredom in (Inter)action

Andrew Nevin, Cyber-Psychopathy Revisited: An Alternative Framework for Explaining Online Deviance

Laila Omar, “What would my future be?”: Conceptualization of the “future” among Syrian newcomer mothers in Canada

Natalia Otto, The violent art of making do: Gendered narratives of criminalized girls in Southern Brazil

Laura Upenieks and Ron Levi (with John Hagan of Northwestern University), The Palliative Function of Legality Beliefs on Mental Health

 

 

Professor Neda Maghbouleh featured on the “Ajam Podcast”

Professor Neda Maghbouleh spoke on the Ajam Podcast, a platform that challenges simplistic representations of the ‘Ajam’ region in Western media, and brings academic debates on the topic to a wider audience. After discussing the major themes and reception of her book, The Limits of Whiteness: Iranian Americans and the Everyday Politics of Race, Professor Maghbouleh talks about her latest project that focuses on the resettlement of Syrian refugees in Canada since 2015. She articulates how Trudeau has used Syrian resettlement to present a different political vision of who Canada is as a “multicultural tolerant society.” However, the romanticized view of a refugee community, to show Canada as its best self on the political stage, still results in the exclusion and discrimination of many Syrian refugees once they land. Professor Maghbouleh is currently leading a five-year study on 100 Syrian newcomers and their teenage children to track their lived experiences of resettlement in Canada.

Listen to the full podcast here. Professor Maghbouleh begins discussing her new project at 19:53.

Professor Maghbouleh is an Assistant Professor of Sociology with teaching duties at the UTM campus. Her work addresses racism and immigration, with a particular interest in groups from the broad Middle East. She brings together the study of international migration and race/ethnicity to learn how refugees and immigrants from the Middle East and North Africa navigate new worlds in North America. These topics are explored in her recently published book, The Limits of Whiteness, and will continue to be examined through her research projects.

Professor Neda Maghbouleh and Professor Jasmine Rault Featured on UTM’s View to the U Podcast

Jasmine RaultProfessors Neda Maghbouleh and Jasmine Rault were featured on the UTM research podcast, View to the U. They discuss the research they are currently working on, including topics such as race, immigration, sexuality, archives, and digital humanities. The podcast provides a fascinating look into what really goes into conducting a research study.

Dr. Maghbouleh’s work addresses racism and immigration, with a particular interest in groups from the broad Middle East. Her first book, The Limits of Whiteness: Iranian Americans and the Everyday Politics of Race is out in September 2017 with Stanford University Press. Research currently underway includes a SSHRC-funded project on stress and the integration of Syrian newcomer mothers in Toronto and Peel regions (with Melissa Milkie and Ito Peng); a Connaught-funded project on boundaries and inequalities in local mothers’ groups; and survey research on the “new U.S. racial and ethnic hierarchy” (with Ariela Schachter and René Flores).

Cross-appointed with ICCIT and Sociology, Rault’s research focuses on sexuality, gender, race and ethnicity as axes of power, cultural change and aesthetic potentiality. Her work takes queer feminist approaches to architecture and design, decolonizing digital research ethics and economies, and the affective politics of sexuality in transnational arts and social movements.

We have included an excerpt from the podcast’s transcript below. Listen to the podcast here on Soundcloud and find the transcript here.

Neda Maghbouleh (NM): This is as our pilot study with Syrian mothers was coming to a close and as fairly mainstream researchers, methodologically speaking in sociology, we dipped our toe into something slightly inspired by a participatory action research (PAR), where researchers and participants are working really collaboratively. Though we didn’t do a full on PAR type of a project but we dipped our toe via convening a panel at that conference that included the three professors who had spearheaded the original project, a team of our RAs who had been integral into actually conducting the ethnographic work.

These were graduate students across UofT who speak Arabic and were able to really be these incredible interlocutors without whom we couldn’t have done this. We also had the voices of two mothers who were very keen to be part of the research process with us. We had invited the mothers also to join us on this panel. As you would imagine, the audience was vaguely interested in what the profs said, a little bit more interested in what our RAs shared, but keenly interested in the insights from our two research participants, the mothers.

Jasmine Rault (JR): A discovery is one that just kind of keeps happening again and again, the surprising discovery that sometimes your research participants say no and you have to be like, “Oh, that’s not just obstructive. Let’s think of that as generative in some way.” Sometimes they say, “Yes, but,” and that “but” is a more complicated and awesome way of saying no. It’s like, “Yeah, I’ll do that with you if you change everything about your research question.” So they say yes but then they entirely change the trajectory of the research. That’s the kind of discovery that keeps me interested on a bunch of different scales.

Listen to the full podcast here and find the transcript here.

Congratulations to Professor Neda Maghbouleh, recipient of an Ontario Early Research Award

Congratulations to Professor Neda Maghbouleh who was recently awarded with one of this year’s Province of Ontario’s Early Researcher Awards. The goal of the Early Researcher Award is to help early career researchers build their research teams. Funded by the Ministry of Research, Innovation and Sciences, the Early Researcher Award provides five years of research funding to exceptional scholars whose research is poised to make an impact on Ontario’s social, cultural and/or economic future. Professor Maghbouleh received the grant for her work studying the experiences of Syrian newcomers in Toronto. This research is part of a larger project that Maghbouleh is pursuing with Professors Ito Peng and Melissa Milkie.

Professor Maghbouleh’s Early Researcher Award project, titled “Settlement, Integration and Stress: A 5-Yr Longitudinal Study of Syrian Newcomer Mothers and Teens in the GTA,” builds on work that Maghbouleh began with Peng and Milkie and financial support from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. This project focuses on how Syrian refugee mothers and teens experience family and integration-related stress in the three to five years following settlement. Because two-thirds of Canada’s Wave 1 of Syrian refugee newcomers are children under the age of 18 or the adults caring for them, it is reasonable to expect that they face the enormous tasks involved in acclimatizing themselves to a different culture and environment at the same time as they are dealing with the strains typically associated with childhood, adolescence and parenthood. This research will offer tangible strategies for Ontario’s service providers, sponsor groups, and everyday citizens to more efficiently and effectively support newcomers.

Professor Maghbouleh is an Assistant Professor of Sociology with teaching responsibilities at the University of Toronto, Mississauga campus. Her research program addresses the social integration of immigrants from the Middle East who settle in North America. This project follows the completion of her first major research project, on Iranians and race in the U.S., and the publication of her book, The Limits of Whiteness: Iranian Americans and the Everyday Politics of Race.

The Annex Sociology podcast hosts Professor Neda Maghbouleh on Iranian-Americans and Whiteness

The Annex Sociology podcast recently hosted Professor Neda Maghbouleh in which they talked about the Oscars, issues around defining generations, and about her recent book, The Limits of Whiteness: Iranian Americans and the Everyday Politics of Race. The Annex is a weekly academic “sociology-themed podcast” hosted by sociologists from CUNY, Georgetown and UCLA.

Professor Maghbouleh is an Assistant Professor in Sociology with teaching responsibilities at the Mississauga campus.

The podcast with Professor Maghbouleh was episode 23 and is available here.

Professor Neda Maghbouleh interviewed on KMSU Weekly Reader (89.7FM)

Sociology Professor Neda Maghbouleh recently appeared in a interview on the KMSU Weekly Reader, discussing her research and recently published book, The Limits of Whiteness: Iranian Americans and the Everyday Politics of Race. Professor Maghbouleh is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto with teaching responsibilities on the UTM campus. Her research focuses on racism and immigration, with a particular interest in the experiences of groups from the broad Middle East. The Limits of Whiteness was published in September 2017 with Stanford University Press.

The KMSU Weekly Reader is a weekly radio program produced by graduate students at the Minnesota State University, Mankato. The program features interviews with authors hosted by graduate students at the university.

The full interview is available for listening here.

Professor Neda Maghbouleh interviewed on New Books Network podcast

Professor Neda Maghbouleh was recently interviewed on the New Books Network podcast. She discussed her new book The Limits of Whiteness: Iranian Americans and the Everyday Politics of Race, which examines the racialized experiences of young Iranian-Americans. The New Books Network is a “consortium of podcasts dedicated to raising the level of public discourse by introducing serious authors to a wide public.” Professor Maghbouleh’s book was featured on the Sociology channel of the New Books Network podcast; she was interviewed by Sarah E. Patterson who is a host on the network and a postdoc in Sociology at the University of Western Ontario. Professor Maghbouleh is an Assistant Professor of Sociology with teaching responsibilities at the UTM campus.

The podcast is available for download and streaming here.

Professor Neda Maghbouleh featured on USC podcast

Professor Neda Maghbouleh was recently featured in USC Annenberg’s Michael Radcliffe’s podcast on Tehrangeles, a Los Angeles neighbourhood that’s home to the largest population of Iranians outside of Iran. In the podcast, Professor Maghbouleh discusses the importance of the area, and how it creates a connection to a home country for its mainly Iranian immigrant population though Iranian-owned businesses and cultural aesthetics. The area provides its residents with a sense of home and belonging, despite being thousands of miles away from Iran. Professor Maghbouleh is an Assistant Professor of Sociology with undergraduate teaching responsibilities at the UTM campus. Her research focuses on race and immigration. She released her first book, The Limits of Whiteness: Iranian Americans and the Everyday Politics of Race, in September.

 Listen to the podcast here.

Professor Neda Maghbouleh featured in UofT News

Sociology Assistant Professor Neda Maghbouleh was recently featured in the U of T News discussing her latest book,  The Limits of Whiteness: Iranian Americans and the Everyday Politics of Race. In the article Professor Maghbouleh explains the motivations for her research as well as the methods she employed to learn about Iranian-American youth experiences in the USA.

We have posted an excerpt of the article below.

U of T’s Neda Maghbouleh explores culture, identity and discrimination in new book about Iranian-Americans

By Romi Levine | Oct. 26, 2017

When President Donald Trump introduced an executive order barring people from six majority-Muslim countries from entering the U.S., it was further confirmation for Neda Maghbouleh of what she learned from years spent researching her latest book The Limits of Whiteness: Iranian Americans and the Everyday Politics of Race.

“The people it affected the most proportionately were Iranians and it was precisely because of the predicament I’m describing in the book,” says Maghbouleh, an assistant professor in the department of sociology at University of Toronto Mississauga.

The Limits of Whiteness explores the grey area where Iranian-Americans exist – they’re legally categorized as white but socially and culturally are often excluded and discriminated against, she says.

To get a real understanding of what it’s like to be an Iranian-American, Maghbouleh interviewed and shadowed 84 young people living across the United States whose parents were born in Iran.

“I was interested in knowing more about the nitty-gritty of everyday life,” she says. “There was so little written about Iranians and I was in the field with my ears open to try to see what were the salient issues.”

Read the full article here.

Professor Neda Maghbouleh on how place makes race

A chapter from Professor Neda Maghbouleh’s recently published book, The Limits of Whiteness: Iranian Americans and the Everyday Politics of Race, was recently featured in a blog post on the Standford University Press Blog. The chapter explores how race becomes constructed through one’s ties to certain places. Professor Maghbouleh teaches at the UTM campus and studies race and immigration, with a focus on groups from the broad Middle East. We have posted an excerpt of the blog post below.

WHERE ARE YOU FROM?
How place determines race for racially in-between immigrants.

by Neda Maghbouleh

July 4, 2002, was a particularly humid Independence Day in Boston. It was the summer between my sophomore and junior years of college. I had stayed on campus to work, and for the first time my family had come to visit me in New England. That year, we found ourselves among the thousands of revelers who descended in undulating waves down to the banks of the Charles River to see the fireworks. My mom and little sister scrambled onto the first available patch of grass while I unrolled a blanket I had snatched off my twin-size dorm room bed hours earlier. My aunt unpacked almonds, cantaloupe, and soda from a plastic shopping bag; my dad, ambling slowly, as he does, brought up the rear.

As we fanned ourselves on the blanket, my parents discussed how twenty years earlier to the day they had boarded a Fourth of July flight to Portland, Oregon, with me, at nine months old, in tow. We were striking out on our own, away from New York City, where I was born and where, as new immigrants from Iran, my parents worked in a Persian rug store owned by my dad’s extended family.

That morning in Boston I was the last to notice the white woman on the next blanket over who was staring at us in disgust. She stared at my dad in particular, who in a bit of confusion politely smiled back at her between his bites of cantaloupe. She whispered something in her companion’s ear; they rolled up their blanket and left, flip-flop sandals smacking up and down against the ground. We didn’t see or think about the women for a few minutes until two men in sunglasses and cargo shorts began to walk in wide circles around our blanket. “Oh my God,” my mom whispered to me in Persian. “The cops are watching us.” The July humidity was already intense, but it began to feel suffocating. Within seconds, a uniformed police officer and his K-9 approached us.

“What brings you folks down here today?” the officer asked my dad.

“Fourth of July, the fireworks,” my dad replied.

The K-9 sniffed the plastic bag that held our snacks as the officer probed further: “Okay, where are you from?”

“We’re visiting our daughter; she goes to college here. We are from Portland, Oregon,” my dad said softly.

Like the two women before him, who now stood smirking at a safe distance away from us, the officer seemed unconvinced. He scrutinized our blanket and what sat on it: four women, one man, all of them sweaty, with dark hair, skin between white and brown, speaking to each other in English and something else. The uniformed officer made a slight gesture and, before the plainclothes officers he’d signaled swooped in for backup, he clarified the question: “I didn’t ask where you live. I said where are you from?”

Read the full post here.

Professor Neda Maghbouleh’s new book asks what “whiteness” means for Iranian Americans

Professor Neda Maghbouleh has recently published a book exploring the racialization of Iranian Americans. The Limits of Whiteness: Iranian Americans and the Everyday Politics of Race draws on ethnographic and archival research that Professor Maghbouleh began in her dissertation and postdoctoral research projects to show how Iranians navigate ambiguous identities in the American racial landscape.

The book’s publisher, Stanford University Press, includes the following blurb on their website:

When Roya, an Iranian American high school student, is asked to identify her race, she feels anxiety and doubt. According to the federal government, she and others from the Middle East are white. Indeed, a historical myth circulates even in immigrant families like Roya’s, proclaiming Iranians to be the “original” white race. But based on the treatment Roya and her family receive in American schools, airports, workplaces, and neighborhoods—interactions characterized by intolerance or hate—Roya is increasingly certain that she is not white. In The Limits of Whiteness, Neda Maghbouleh offers a groundbreaking, timely look at how Iranians and other Middle Eastern Americans move across the color line.

By shadowing Roya and more than 80 other young people, Maghbouleh documents Iranian Americans’ shifting racial status. Drawing on never-before-analyzed historical and legal evidence, she captures the unique experience of an immigrant group trapped between legal racial invisibility and everyday racial hyper-visibility. Her findings are essential for understanding the unprecedented challenge Middle Easterners now face under “extreme vetting” and potential reclassification out of the “white” box. Maghbouleh tells for the first time the compelling, often heartbreaking story of how a white American immigrant group can become brown and what such a transformation says about race in America.

Read more about the book and Professor Maghbouleh’s research on her website.

Professor Neda Maghbouleh interviewed about Syrian refugee families by Canadian Family

Neda MaghboulehCanadian Family magazine recently ran an article featuring an interview with Professor Neda Maghbouleh. Professor Maghbouleh is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto, with teaching responsibilities on the Mississauga campus. The article asks how Canadians can help Syrian refugee families as they settle in Canada. Professor Maghbouleh’s answers draw from the SSHRC-funded study she is currently conducting with Professors Melissa Milkie and Ito Peng that investigates the mental health challenges faced by Syrian refugee parents.

The full interview is available on the Canadian Family website. We have posted an excerpt of it here.

Making Canada a Home: How Canadians Can Help Syrian Families

Syrian families face cultural, financial, and emotional challenges as newcomers to Canada. Here’s how everyday Canadians can help.

Many parents know the difficulties that come with moving. Leaving behind friends, family, and neighbours can be hard for kids, and at times even heartbreaking. Meanwhile, adjusting to life in a new home can be a long process, taking anywhere from months to years.

Add to these factors a mix of cultural, linguistic, and financial barriers, and migrating families face a unique set of challenges. Yet Syrian families have shouldered theses same burdens as refugees to Canada, and continue to do so, according to a study from the University of Toronto.

A number of these challenges stem from a lack of social resources. Since the launch of Canada’s resettlement program in 2015, sociologists Neda Maghbouleh, Ito Peng, and Melissa Milkie have interviewed Syrian mothers on how immigration has impacted their mental health. Many Syrian mothers expressed feelings of social isolation, with those under government sponsorships describing fewer social ties.

Over time, these feelings of isolation can take an emotional toll. “Uprooting your life to move from one home to another is already a very stressful life event,” Maghbouleh explains. “But for refugees, a sense of control over their destiny can feel elusive or undermined in a new land. So it’s crucial for Canadians to respect and support Syrian newcomers’ sense of agency, purpose, and self-confidence in the process of resettlement.

Read the full article.

3 Sociology professors look into parenting stress experienced by Syrian refugees

Melissa MilkieNeda MaghboulehIto PengWith fully 60 percent of Canada’s recent influx of Syrian refugees being under the age of 15, this group is largely composed of children and the adults who care for them. The parents or primary caregivers of these children face both the enormous tasks involved in acclimatizing themselves to a new culture and environment and the strains linked to the financial support, schooling, and care of children. Funded by SSHRC as part of a special call for research into the experiences of the Syrian refugees, research by Professors Melissa Milkie, Neda Maghbouleh and Ito Peng seeks to understand the parenting stress that these new Canadians experience.

The three professors recently presented some of the early findings at the Metropolis conference in Montreal. Reporting on 43 wave 1 interviews, preliminary findings show three major stressors that Syrian refugee mothers experience. First, a major stressor for most Syrian refugee mothers upon resettlement is the crystallization of deep losses – such as the separation from close family members like their own parents, who are unable, unwilling or are not chosen to be resettled in Canada. The extended family is thus not able to support mothers in the ways they may have in the past. Second, school stressors exist for some families, but are relatively minor and most often solved readily; and/or resources to solve school concerns are clear. Finally, although mothers feel a sense of mastery in their successful creation of physical safety for their children, they experience a powerful cultural stressor in their lack of control over their children’s distant but impending adulthood in a new land with different cultural standards and norms.

They will be presenting an invited panel at the Canadian Sociological Association meeting on May 31st.

Professor Neda Maghbouleh on NPR

Neda MaghboulehProfessor Neda Maghbouleh recently spoke on the NPR show Code Switch about why some people say Persian and some say Iranian.

Code Switch is a  podcast about race and identity. On April 19th, the show responded to the letters from their listeners. At minute 9:41, they called on Professor Maghbouleh to discuss the complications around the Iranian diaspora and racial or ethnic identity.

Listen to the show here.

Neda Maghbouleh speaks to CTV and Global on Islamophobia in Canada

The Quebec City mosque shooting on January 29th was an indication of Islamophobia in Canada. Shortly after the shooting, Professor Neda Maghbouleh spoke on CTV and Global News about the danger of Islamophobia. Professor Maghbouleh is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto, with teaching responsibilities at the UTM campus. Her research specializes in race, racism and immigration.

She spoke on CTV and Global in the wake of the shooting in a Quebec City mosque on Sunday, January 29th.

Watch the Global News interview here

Professor Neda Maghbouleh featured on UTM’s Research News site

The Research Office at the University of Toronto, Mississauga recently posted a profile of Professor Neda Maghbouleh, a sociologist specializing in race and ethnicity. The full profile is available here. The following is an excerpt:

Hitting Home

Wednesday, October 12, 2016 – 4:35pm
Carla DeMarco
U of T Mississauga Sociology prof studies migration, minorities and moms’ groups.

Professor Neda Maghbouleh from UTM’s Department of Sociology says she is enjoying a sweet spot of satisfaction that she attributes to the string of successes she’s had of late: her first book, The Limits of Whiteness: Iranian-Americans and the Everyday Politics of Race, is being published by Stanford University Press and has been called “groundbreaking,” and the recently funded research projects she is working on have the potential for significant social impact.

“I feel like I am in the ‘pink cloud’ of happiness right now, where my new projects haven’t hit roadblocks yet,” says Maghbouleh, who is currently following three streams in her research.

First, Maghbouleh is embarking on a new collaboration with Professors Melissa Milkie (UTM) and Ito Peng (UTSG) with funds awarded this fall by a rapid response, targeted opportunity to study Syrian newcomers and integration.

This project is supported by a joint initiative through the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) and Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC). Their research team will focus on assessing parenting and integration stress among Syrian newcomer parents whose children have integrated into local schools at the elementary- and secondary-school levels.

Read the full profile.

What happens when first-time mothers take maternity leave?

What happens when first-time mothers take maternity leave?

For one thing, they begin to socialize with each other. With months or years away from the workforce and a whole new identity as a parent, women often seek out groups where they share parenting-related knowledge and, in many cases, gain emotional and social support. The women benefit in obvious ways – they feel less isolated, they share knowledge and insights, and they experience mental and physical health benefits.

But the benefits may also reach beyond the individual.

A new research project undertaken by Professor Neda Maghbouleh will study the ways in which involvement in mothers’ groups affects civic engagement, and how this varies in different parts of the city and by different axes of inequality.

In Toronto, there are examples of mothers’ groups, initially formed for post-partum socialization, that engage in civic work like neighbourhood revitalization, refugee sponsorship, and local fundraising. Some of the groups are formally organized by provinces and local municipalities and led by public health nurses or social workers; others are formally or informally established among neighbours, library patrons, or local café “regulars.” In either case, they are deeply embedded in the local community.

Which might explain a growth of civic engagement.

It is unlikely, however, that the experience is uniform across the city. Social life in Toronto has increasingly polarized around axes of inequality like income/class, immigration status, and race/ethnicity/religion. Given rising levels of inequity in the city, any positive outcomes associated with mothers’ groups are likely to be deeply entwined with, and shaped by, social inequality

Professor Maghbouleh has recently received a Connaught New Researcher Award to fund the initial stages of this project. With this funding, she and a graduate student will map the formal and informal mothers’ groups in Toronto and conduct pilot interviews with a strategically sampled selection of the women in these groups.