Congratulations to the 11 PhD graduates of 2016/17

Convocation at Con HallThis year, eleven of our PhD students successfully defended their dissertations and graduated with their doctorates. Follow the careers of our PhD graduates by perusing our PhD alumni page. Congratulations this year go to:

Salina Abji

Salina’s dissertation was Emerging Citizenships: Efforts to Address Violence against Non-Status Women in Toronto and she was supervised by Anna Korteweg (supervisor), Patricia Landolt, and Judith Taylor. Salina is currently a SSHRC postdoctoral fellow at Carleton University. Read more about Salina on her website or here.

Holly Campeau

Holly’s dissertation was Policing in unsettled times: An Analysis of Culture in the Police Organization. She was supervised by Ron Levi (supervisor), Candace Kruttschnitt, and Josée Johnston. Holly will start a new position as Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Alberta this fall. Read more about Holly here.

Steven Cook

Steven’s dissertation was A Comparative Analysis of the Violent Victimization Experiences of Street and School Youth. He was supervised by Julian Tanner (supervisor), David Brownfield, and Scot Wortley (U of T Criminology). Steven is currently a lecturer in quantitative methods and criminology at Cardiff University.

Kim de Laat

Kim’s dissertation was Mesa-Level Influences on Creativity and her committee was Shyon Baumann (supervisor), Vanina Leschziner, and Damian Phillips (Columbia Business School).  Kim is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Gender + the Economy in the Rotman School of Business at the University of Toronto. Read more about Kim on her website.

Jennifer Elrick

Jennifer’s dissertation was Family/Class: State-Based Boundary Work around Immigration and National Identity in Germany and Canada Since 1955. She was supervised by Anna Korteweg (supervisor), Patricia Landolt, and Jeffrey Reitz. Jennifer is currently an Assistant Professor of Sociology at McGill University.

Nathan Innocente

Nathan’s dissertation was Organizational Risk and Mortgage Fraud. He was supervised by Sandy Welsh (supervisor), Ronit Dinovitzer, and Kelly Hannah-Moffat (U of T Criminology). He is currently an Assistant Professor (teaching stream) at the University of Toronto, Mississauga. Read more about Nathan here.

Emily Laxer

Emily wrote her dissertation on Democratic Struggles and the National Identity Formation: The Politics of Secularism in France and Quebec. She completed her degree under the supervision of Anna Korteweg (supervisor), Monica Boyd, and Erik Schneiderhan. Emily is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Diana Miller

Diana’s dissertation was titled Gendering Cultural Fields. She was supervised by Cynthia Cranford (supervisor), Vanina Leschziner, and Bonnie Erickson. Diana works as the Data Analysis Coordinator for York Region. Read more about Diana here.

Joanne Nowak

Joanne’s dissertation was Moving Beyond the Lone Skilled Migrant: Establishing a Social Model of Skilled Migration and Integration Through a Case Study of Ghanaian Nurses. She was supervised by Cynthia Cranford (supervisor), Patricia Landolt, and Monica Boyd. Joanne is the academic coordinator for the Blum Centre at the University of Californa, Santa Barbara.

Agata Piekosz

Agata wrote her dissertation on Polish Catholic Priests in Canada and Ireland: Migration, Leadership, and the Mobility of Strangers. She was supervised by Anna Korteweg and Y. Michal Bodemann (co-supervisor), and Judith Taylor. Agata is currently an instructor at King’s University College.

Siyue Tian

Siyue’s dissertation was Living Arrangements and Intergenerational Supports Among Immigrant and Canadian-born Seniors. She worked under the supervision of Monica Boyd (supervisor), Cynthia Cranford, and Markus Schafer. Siyue is currently an analyst with Statistics Canada.

Salina Abji awarded Dennis William Magill Canada Research Award

salina-abjiCongratulations to Salina Abji, whose dissertation was recently awarded the 2016 Dennis William Magill Canada Research Award for best dissertation or published paper on Canadian society by a PhD student in the Department of Sociology. Salina defended her dissertation, entitled Emerging Logics of Citizenship: Activism in Response to Precarious Migration and Gendered Violence in an Era of Securitization, in the fall of 2016.

In their assessment of Dr Abji’s dissertation, members of the awards committee (Professors Robert Brym, Phil Goodman, John Hannigan, Ann Mullen and Jack Veugelers) wrote as follows:

We consider Dr. Abji’s work a clearly written and thoroughly researched reassessment of postnationalist theory – the idea that a growing number of people are coming to think of themselves and others as members of a global community enjoying rights that extend to all of humanity.

It accomplishes this task by demonstrating that Canadian immigration activists and federal employees increasingly used postnational human rights ideas to inform their actions during the years of the Harper government. Activists did so as they blocked immigration authorities from entering schools, women’s shelters and other institutions to investigate and deport nonstatus migrants. Some state employees followed suit by reacting negatively to secularization measures and questioning the legitimacy of citizenship rights as narrowly defined by the government.

In short, Dr. Abji’s ethnographic fieldwork, qualitative interviews and discourse analysis show that postnationalism provides both theoretical leverage and activist guidance.

Salina is currently a SSHRC post-doctoral fellow at Carleton University.