Ph.D. Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron,on “Experiences of Muslim and Non-Muslim battered immigrant women with the police in the United States”

Ph.D. Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron, in collaboration with Professor Nawal Ammar, Professor Shahid Alvi and Jaclyn San Antonio published an article in Violence Against Women, entitled “Experiences of Muslim and Non-Muslim battered immigrant women with the police in the United States: A closer understanding of commonalities and differences.” The article aims to fill the gap in knowledge concerning the nature of interpersonal violence and help-seeking behaviour of the battered Muslim immigrant women population in the United States.

Amanda Couture-Carron is currently a Ph.D. candidate in sociology at the University of Toronto. Her research interests include intimate partner abuse, immigrant women and first- and second-generation immigrant youth experiences (e.g. identity, acculturation, sexuality). Professor Nawal Ammar is the Dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, as well as a Professor Law and Justice at Rowan University. Professor Shahid Alvi is an award-winning researcher and professor in the  Faculty of Social Science and Humanities at the Ontario Tech University. Jaclyn San Antonio is a Ph.D. Candidate in Social Justice Education at the University of Toronto in Canada.

We have posted the citation and the abstract of the article below. The full text is available here.

Ammar, N., Couture-Carron, A., Alvi, S. & San Antonio, J. (2013). Experiences of Muslim and Non-Muslim battered immigrant women with the police in the United States: A closer understanding of commonalities and differences. Violence Against Women, 19(12), 1449-1471.

Little research has been conducted to distinguish the unique experiences of specific groups of interpersonal violence victims. This is especially true in the case of battered Muslim immigrant women in the United States. This article examines battered Muslim immigrant women’s experiences with intimate partner violence and their experiences with the police. Furthermore, to provide a more refined view related to battered Muslim immigrant women’s situation, the article compares the latter group’s experiences to battered non-Muslim immigrant women’s experiences. Finally, we seek to clarify the similarities and differences between battered immigrant women aiming to inform responsive police service delivery.