PhD Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron and Professor Monica Boyd on “Cross-Nativity Partnering and the Political Participation of Immigrant Generations”

Boyd, MonicaPhD Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron and Professor Monica Boyd have co-authored an article published in The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, entitled “Cross-Nativity Partnering and the Political Participation of Immigrant Generations.” The article explores cross-nativity intermarriage and its political implications.

Amanda Couture-Carron is a Doctoral Candidate in the Department of Sociology and the University of Toronto studying pathways to deviance across immigrant generations.

Monica Boyd is a Canada Research Chair in Immigration, Inequality and Public Policy and Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto (St. George), which she joined in 2001. Her current research projects are on immigrant inequality in the labour force, the migration of high skilled labor, the socio-economic achievements of immigrant offspring and the migration and employment of care workers.

We have posted the citation and the abstract of the article below. The full text is available here.

Boyd, M. & Couture-Carron, A. (2015). Cross-nativity partnering and the political participation of immigrant generations. The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 662(1), 88-206.

This article defines cross-nativity intermarriage in four generations of Canadians and explores whether cross-nativity partnering is associated with political assimilation—in this case, similarity in voting and political activities between immigrants with native-born partners and third-plus-generation immigrants. We find that foreign-born residents with Canadian-born partners do not differ from third-plus-generation residents who have Canadian-born partners in their propensities to vote or in the number of political activities in which they participate. Conversely, the foreign-born with foreign-born partners are less likely than the third-plus generation to have voted in a previous federal election; if the foreign-born immigrated later in adolescence or in adulthood, they also are less likely to participate in other political activities. Differences in demographic and socioeconomic characteristics underlie the greater likelihood that second and third-plus generations will engage in political activities.