PhD Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron co-authors article, entitled “The power of technology: an exploratory qualitative analysis of how South Asian youth use technology for initiating and maintaining cross-gender relationships”

PhD Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron, in collaboration with Professors Eleanor Maticka-Tyndale and Arshia Zaidi, has published an article in South Asian Diaspora, entitled “The power of technology: an exploratory qualitative analysis of how South Asian youth use technology for initiating and maintaining cross-gender relationships.” The article investigates how South Asian youth in Canada use computer-mediated communication (CMC) to navigate cross-gender intimate relationships.

Amanda Couture-Carron is a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Toronto studying pathways to deviance across immigrant generations.

We have posted the citation and the abstract of the article below. The full text is available here.

Zaidi, A., Couture, A. & Maticka-Tyndale, E. (2012). The power of technology: an exploratory qualitative analysis of how South Asian youth use technology for initiating and maintaining cross-gender relationships. South Asian Diaspora, 4(2), 175-194.

This research explores how South Asian youth in Canada use computer-mediated communication (CMC) such as social networking sites, cell phones and instant messaging in their cross-gender intimate relationships. Using 42 qualitative interviews conducted with second-generation South Asian Canadians living in the Greater Toronto Area and Durham region, this article sheds light on the motives for using CMC as well as negative consequences that can emerge. The data reveal that South Asian youth are using CMC to initiate and build relationships,  remain connected with partners, engage in discreet communication, to ease uncomfortable and intimate discussions, and to communicate when face-to-face interaction is not available. Gender, religion and country of origin differences were rare, but did appear in a few motives. Negative consequences of CMC use volunteered by participants include parental–child conflict over restriction and questioning CMC use and its use leading to parents’ discovery of a ‘secret’ relationship. Overall, CMC provided a means for second-generation South Asian youth in Canada to overtly adhere to norms of gender-separation while covertly engaging in cross-gender relationships. If not discovered, this helped to maintain family honour within the South Asian community while fulfilling their perceived need for cross-gender friendships and romantic involvements.