PhD Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron co-authors article on the experiences of cross-gender relationships amongst South Asian youth in Canada

PhD Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron, in collaboration with Mehek Arif and Professors Ali Zaidi and Eleanor Maticka-Tyndale, has published an article in the Canadian Ethnic Studies Association, entitled “Ethnic identity, religion and gender: An exploration of intersecting identities creating diverse perceptions & experiences with intimate cross-gender relationships amongst South Asian youth in Canada.” The article analyzes whether the intersections of gender, ethnicity and religion influence the levels of acceptance of and experiences with intimate cross-gender relationships among South-Asian youth in Canada.

Amanda Couture-Carron is a PhD candidate at the University of Toronto studying pathways to deviance across immigrant generations.

We have posted the citation and the abstract of the article below. The full text is available here.

Zaidi, A., Couture, A., Maticka-Tyndale, E. & Arif, M. (2014). Ethnic identity, religion and gender: An exploration of intersecting identities creating diverse perceptions & experiences with intimate cross-gender relationships amongst South Asian youth in Canada. Canadian Ethnic Studies, 46(2), 27-54.

The migration of South Asians from one country to another is becoming increasingly common. This movement comes with post migratory challenges that extend to second-generation South Asians who have to negotiate socialization into two often conflicting sets of values, beliefs, attitudes, and practices: those within and those outside the home. One such challenge faced by secondgeneration South Asians is the negotiation and formation of cross-gender heterosexual relationships. Using qualitative data, specifically in-depth interviews with second-generation South Asian Christians, Muslims, and Hindus in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), this paper examines how intersections of gender, ethnicity, and religion shape participants’ perceptions of and experiences with intimate cross-gender relationships. The results indicate that there are variations within each source of identity, and acceptance of and experiences with intimate cross-gender relationships differ depending on how these identities intersect and interact.