Professor Akwasi Owusu-Bempah: Canada Should Legalize All Recreational Drugs

Akwasi Owusu-BempahProfessor Akwasi Owusu-Bempah recently wrote and published an opinion piece in the University of Toronto Magazine, entitled “Canada Should Legalize All Recreational Drugs.” Professor Owusu-Bempah is a Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Toronto, with teaching responsibilities at the UTM campus. He is also the director of research for Cannabis Amnesty, a Canadian organization advocating for pardons for non-violent, minor cannabis offenses.

The full article is available on magazine.utoronto.ca. I have pasted an excerpt from the article below.

Why are most recreational drugs illegal? If the rationale for the war on drugs is to decrease drug use, it hasn’t worked. It hasn’t stopped the production or importation of drugs. Quite the opposite: there are billions of dollars to be made from the illegal drug trade. This often comes with serious violence – sometimes in Canada, but more often in Mexico 1 and other source countries in South America and Central America.

The United States, in particular, has been waging a war on drugs for several decades, 2 and it’s still one of the world’s largest consumers of cocaine. 3 This should tell us that we’re not going to reduce drug use through the enforcement of laws.

Some people use drugs because they enjoy doing so. Many Canadians already consume a number of drugs each week: alcohol, caffeine and nicotine are the most common. People also use harder drugs recreationally, and of course, some of these people develop substance use and abuse problems. But arresting and incarcerating them is not going to help them deal with the issues that are leading them to use or abuse harder drugs in the first place. This is why a public health approach to all drugs, where we’re striving for harm reduction rather than elimination of use, makes the most sense.

For most of human history, drugs haven’t been illegal. It’s only in the last 110 years that we’ve had drug prohibition in Canada. Even so, my neighbours in downtown Toronto often express surprise that cannabis was legalized just recently. Many think it’s been legal, or at least decriminalized, for some time. They think this because of what they look like and where they live: they don’t have to worry about being arrested.

Read the full article here.