Ph.D. Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron,on “Experiences of Muslim and Non-Muslim battered immigrant women with the police in the United States”

Ph.D. Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron, in collaboration with Professor Nawal Ammar, Professor Shahid Alvi and Jaclyn San Antonio published an article in Violence Against Women, entitled “Experiences of Muslim and Non-Muslim battered immigrant women with the police in the United States: A closer understanding of commonalities and differences.” The article aims to fill the gap in knowledge concerning the nature of interpersonal violence and help-seeking behaviour of the battered Muslim immigrant women population in the United States.

Amanda Couture-Carron is currently a Ph.D. candidate in sociology at the University of Toronto. Her research interests include intimate partner abuse, immigrant women and first- and second-generation immigrant youth experiences (e.g. identity, acculturation, sexuality). Professor Nawal Ammar is the Dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, as well as a Professor Law and Justice at Rowan University. Professor Shahid Alvi is an award-winning researcher and professor in the  Faculty of Social Science and Humanities at the Ontario Tech University. Jaclyn San Antonio is a Ph.D. Candidate in Social Justice Education at the University of Toronto in Canada.

We have posted the citation and the abstract of the article below. The full text is available here.

Ammar, N., Couture-Carron, A., Alvi, S. & San Antonio, J. (2013). Experiences of Muslim and Non-Muslim battered immigrant women with the police in the United States: A closer understanding of commonalities and differences. Violence Against Women, 19(12), 1449-1471.

Little research has been conducted to distinguish the unique experiences of specific groups of interpersonal violence victims. This is especially true in the case of battered Muslim immigrant women in the United States. This article examines battered Muslim immigrant women’s experiences with intimate partner violence and their experiences with the police. Furthermore, to provide a more refined view related to battered Muslim immigrant women’s situation, the article compares the latter group’s experiences to battered non-Muslim immigrant women’s experiences. Finally, we seek to clarify the similarities and differences between battered immigrant women aiming to inform responsive police service delivery.

 

PhD Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron and Professor Monica Boyd on “Cross-Nativity Partnering and the Political Participation of Immigrant Generations”

Boyd, MonicaPhD Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron and Professor Monica Boyd have co-authored an article published in The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, entitled “Cross-Nativity Partnering and the Political Participation of Immigrant Generations.” The article explores cross-nativity intermarriage and its political implications.

Amanda Couture-Carron is a Doctoral Candidate in the Department of Sociology and the University of Toronto studying pathways to deviance across immigrant generations.

Monica Boyd is a Canada Research Chair in Immigration, Inequality and Public Policy and Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto (St. George), which she joined in 2001. Her current research projects are on immigrant inequality in the labour force, the migration of high skilled labor, the socio-economic achievements of immigrant offspring and the migration and employment of care workers.

We have posted the citation and the abstract of the article below. The full text is available here.

Boyd, M. & Couture-Carron, A. (2015). Cross-nativity partnering and the political participation of immigrant generations. The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 662(1), 88-206.

This article defines cross-nativity intermarriage in four generations of Canadians and explores whether cross-nativity partnering is associated with political assimilation—in this case, similarity in voting and political activities between immigrants with native-born partners and third-plus-generation immigrants. We find that foreign-born residents with Canadian-born partners do not differ from third-plus-generation residents who have Canadian-born partners in their propensities to vote or in the number of political activities in which they participate. Conversely, the foreign-born with foreign-born partners are less likely than the third-plus generation to have voted in a previous federal election; if the foreign-born immigrated later in adolescence or in adulthood, they also are less likely to participate in other political activities. Differences in demographic and socioeconomic characteristics underlie the greater likelihood that second and third-plus generations will engage in political activities.

PhD Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron co-authors article on South Asian youth’s resistance to cultural deviancy

PhD Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron, in collaboration with Professors Arshia Zaidi and Eleanor Maticka-Tyndale, has published an article in International Journal of Adolescence and Youth, entitled “‘Should I or should I not?’: An exploration of South Asian youth’s resistance to cultural deviancy.” The article investigates how South Asian youth navigate dating and sexuality with regards to competing cultural value systems that exist between their heritage country and host country.

Amanda Couture-Carron is a PhD Candidate at the University of Toronto studying pathways to deviance across immigrant generations.

We have posted the citation and the abstract of the article below.

Zaidi, A., Couture-Carron, A. & Maticka-Tyndale, E. (2013). “Should I or should I not?”: An exploration of South Asian youth’s resistance to cultural deviancy. International Journal of Adolescence and Youth, 4(2), 232-251.

Being and belonging to a South Asian family in Canada does not come without struggles. One theme that has consistently dominated the literature on South Asian immigrant families is the competing cultural value systems that exist between the East (heritage country) and the West (host country). The two cultural scripts adhere to contradictory lifestyle scripts, especially with respect to social and sexual aspects of life. In an individualistic host country, like Canada, things such as dating and sexuality are much more accepted and normalised. These same social endeavours in collectivistic South Asian cultures, where social controls such as family, culture, religion and community dominate decision-making, are stigmatised. In South Asian cultures, these activities are considered culturally deviant because they pose a direct threat to the honour of the family. Using semi-structured interviews, the goal of this study is twofold: first, to uncover the intimate relationship realities of South Asian youth; and second, to understand why some South Asian youth resist cultural deviancy by applying Travis Hirschi’s Social Bond Theory. A quantitative and qualitative analysis of the data revealed four themes that help explain why some participants avoided dating relationships and/or sexual activities, which include attachment to others/affection, commitment to conventional lines of action, involvement in conventional activities, belief system and lack of opportunity.

PhD Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron co-authors article on the experiences of cross-gender relationships amongst South Asian youth in Canada

PhD Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron, in collaboration with Mehek Arif and Professors Ali Zaidi and Eleanor Maticka-Tyndale, has published an article in the Canadian Ethnic Studies Association, entitled “Ethnic identity, religion and gender: An exploration of intersecting identities creating diverse perceptions & experiences with intimate cross-gender relationships amongst South Asian youth in Canada.” The article analyzes whether the intersections of gender, ethnicity and religion influence the levels of acceptance of and experiences with intimate cross-gender relationships among South-Asian youth in Canada.

Amanda Couture-Carron is a PhD candidate at the University of Toronto studying pathways to deviance across immigrant generations.

We have posted the citation and the abstract of the article below. The full text is available here.

Zaidi, A., Couture, A., Maticka-Tyndale, E. & Arif, M. (2014). Ethnic identity, religion and gender: An exploration of intersecting identities creating diverse perceptions & experiences with intimate cross-gender relationships amongst South Asian youth in Canada. Canadian Ethnic Studies, 46(2), 27-54.

The migration of South Asians from one country to another is becoming increasingly common. This movement comes with post migratory challenges that extend to second-generation South Asians who have to negotiate socialization into two often conflicting sets of values, beliefs, attitudes, and practices: those within and those outside the home. One such challenge faced by secondgeneration South Asians is the negotiation and formation of cross-gender heterosexual relationships. Using qualitative data, specifically in-depth interviews with second-generation South Asian Christians, Muslims, and Hindus in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), this paper examines how intersections of gender, ethnicity, and religion shape participants’ perceptions of and experiences with intimate cross-gender relationships. The results indicate that there are variations within each source of identity, and acceptance of and experiences with intimate cross-gender relationships differ depending on how these identities intersect and interact.

PhD Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron on Dating Abuse Against Women in a Cultural Context

PhD Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron published an article in Journal of Interpersonal Violence, entitled “One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Dating Abuse Against Women From the Perspective of South Asian Muslim Youth in Canada.” The article explores dating abuse against women among South Asian Muslim women. The article finds sociocultural variation in the meanings of dating behaviour and demonstrates the value of intersectional analysis.

Amanda Couture-Carron is a PhD candidate at the University of Toronto studying pathways to deviance across immigrant generations.

We have posted the citation and the abstract of the article below. The full text is available here.

Couture-Carron, A. (2016). One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Dating Abuse Against Women From the Perspective of South Asian Muslim Youth in Canada. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 32(23), 3626–3647.

Despite the growing recognition of intersectionality in the field of domestic abuse, scholarship on dating abuse is still limited by its lack of attention to cultural context. To begin to address this gap, this article presents findings from an exploratory qualitative study of 11 South Asian Muslims’ perceptions of behaviors/actions in dating relationships that they identify as being potentially experienced and/or understood differently by South Asian Muslim women. In particular, the participants identify (a) exposure to parents/ community, (b) behaviors of a sexual nature, (c) controlling behaviors, and (d) psychological, emotional, and/or verbal behaviors/abuse as being experienced and understood in unique ways by South Asian Muslim women. By connecting these perceptions to the cultural context of South Asian Muslims, these findings support an intersectionality perspective by suggesting sociocultural variations in the meanings assigned to behaviors and/or actions.

Read the full article here.

PhD Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron co-authors article, entitled “The power of technology: an exploratory qualitative analysis of how South Asian youth use technology for initiating and maintaining cross-gender relationships”

PhD Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron, in collaboration with Professors Eleanor Maticka-Tyndale and Arshia Zaidi, has published an article in South Asian Diaspora, entitled “The power of technology: an exploratory qualitative analysis of how South Asian youth use technology for initiating and maintaining cross-gender relationships.” The article investigates how South Asian youth in Canada use computer-mediated communication (CMC) to navigate cross-gender intimate relationships.

Amanda Couture-Carron is a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Toronto studying pathways to deviance across immigrant generations.

We have posted the citation and the abstract of the article below. The full text is available here.

Zaidi, A., Couture, A. & Maticka-Tyndale, E. (2012). The power of technology: an exploratory qualitative analysis of how South Asian youth use technology for initiating and maintaining cross-gender relationships. South Asian Diaspora, 4(2), 175-194.

This research explores how South Asian youth in Canada use computer-mediated communication (CMC) such as social networking sites, cell phones and instant messaging in their cross-gender intimate relationships. Using 42 qualitative interviews conducted with second-generation South Asian Canadians living in the Greater Toronto Area and Durham region, this article sheds light on the motives for using CMC as well as negative consequences that can emerge. The data reveal that South Asian youth are using CMC to initiate and build relationships,  remain connected with partners, engage in discreet communication, to ease uncomfortable and intimate discussions, and to communicate when face-to-face interaction is not available. Gender, religion and country of origin differences were rare, but did appear in a few motives. Negative consequences of CMC use volunteered by participants include parental–child conflict over restriction and questioning CMC use and its use leading to parents’ discovery of a ‘secret’ relationship. Overall, CMC provided a means for second-generation South Asian youth in Canada to overtly adhere to norms of gender-separation while covertly engaging in cross-gender relationships. If not discovered, this helped to maintain family honour within the South Asian community while fulfilling their perceived need for cross-gender friendships and romantic involvements.

PhD Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron co-authors article on reflexivity and intersecting identities in post-positivist research

PhD Candidate Amanda Couture-Carron, in collaboration with Professors Arshia Zaidi and Eleanor Maticka-Tyndale, has published an article in Qualitative Sociology Review, entitled “Reflexive accounts: Exploring intersectionality and the fluidity of insider/outsider status on the impact on culturally and religiously sensitive post-positivist research.” The article examines the implications of researchers’ intersecting identities in qualitative research in the cultural and religious context.

Amanda Couture-Carron is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of Toronto studying pathways to deviance across immigrant generations.

We have posted the citation and the abstract of the article below. The full text is available here.

Couture, A., Zaidi, A., & Maticka-Tyndale, E. (2012). Reflexive accounts: Exploring intersectionality and the fluidity of insider/outsider status on the impact on culturally and religiously sensitive post-positivist research. Qualitative Sociology Review, VIII(1), 86-105.

Reflexivity and acknowledging the role of the researcher in the research is a well-established practice in post-positivist research. In this paper we use reflexivity to examine our personal experiences in conducting qualitative research. We use reflexivity to understand how our intersecting identities and resulting insider/outsider status may have influenced the data collection phase of a study regarding the culturally and religiously sensitive issue of male-female intimate relationships. Using an intersectional approach, we explore the fluidity of our insider/outsider statuses resulting from our multiple and intersecting identities such as ethnicity, religion, age, and sex. The multiple identities a researcher possesses can cause him/her to be perceived as an insider and outsider simultaneously, which can play a significant role in shaping the interactions between the interviewer and interviewee. We present reflexive accounts on how our identities may have affected the data collection process and participants’ comfort level when discussing sensitive issues, in this case sexuality. Overall, we seek to provide insight into the role of intersecting multiple identities and the resulting insider/outsider status in qualitative data collection when examining culturally and religiously sensitive issues from the perspective of the researchers.