U of T Sociologists at the 2020 ASA

This year, 52 faculty members and graduate students from Sociology at the University of Toronto are participating in the Annual Meeting of the American Sociology Association (ASA). In addition to the people presenting papers, some members are also participating as session organizers, discussants, or journal editorial panelists. This year, the meeting will take place online. The meetings will happen between August 8th and August 11th. Here is a list of the names of academic papers, and/or sections that will be presented below by the day of presentations. Student and recent graduate presenters are shown in italics. Please refer to the ASA Program for complete information.

Saturday, August 8th

Jennifer Peruniak, How Transracial Adoptees See and Negotiate Race

Cynthia J. Cranford and Patricia Roach (with Jennifer Nazareno of Brown University), Organizing Unlikely Subjects: The Constraints and Possibilities for Domestic Worker Organizing in California

David Nicholas Pettinicchio and Jordan Foster, ‘This is Real Beauty’: Defining the Boundaries of Aesthetic Citizenship

Mircea Gherghina, Start-Ups, Social Embeddedness, and Investment Networks

Catherine Tze Hsuan Yeh and Alicia Eads, The Language of Inequality: Inequality in Sociology and Economics, 1886-2015

Andrew Miles and Catherine Tze Hsuan Yeh, Social Locations, Contexts, and Value Development: Testing Whether Demographic Predictors of Personal Values Vary Cross-Nationally

Blair Wheaton, The Intergenerational Transmission of Gender Role Attitudes and Implications for Mental Health in Mid-Adulthood

Cynthia J. Cranford, Organizing Domestic and Care Workers: A Conversation Across University and Community

Scott Schieman (with Alex E. Bierman of University of Calgary and Marisa Christine Young of McMaster University), The Roots of Loneliness in Disadvantage and Exploitation: Implications for Health of the Working Population

Jonathan Horowitz (with Barbara Entwisle, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill), One Event, Two Processes, and Migration in Young Adulthood

Hae Yeon Choo, A Global Urban Sociology of Evictions and Displacement

Sara Mizen (with Andy Walter Holmes of U of T, Anthropology), Ideas for Future Research Roundtable, Table 8: LGBT Families and Life Course

Yangsook Kim, Government Workers and Paid-Daughters: Immigrant Homecare Workers’ Worker Subjectivities in Publicly Funded Care Work

Mitra Mokhtari, An “Extra Target on Your Back”: Somali-Canadian Youth & Barriers in Edmonton’s Public School Board

Sunday, August 9th

William Michelson, Daniel Silver, Fernando A. Calderón Figueroa, and Olimpia Bidian, The Dilemmas of Spatializing Social Issues

Daniel Silver and Fernando A. Calderón Figueroa, Cities and Big Data

Chris M. Smith, Urban Issues: Inequality, Institutions, and Place

Markus Schafer (with Laura Upenieks, University of Texas at San Antonio), Religious Attendance and Physical Health in Later Life: A Life Course Approach

Michelle Pannor Silver, Sociology of Aging

Catherine Tze Hsuan Yeh, Section on Political Sociology Refereed Roundtables

Ioana Sendroiu, ‘Probably Tomorrow I’ll Become a War Criminal’: Autocratic Legalism as Transnational Regime Change

Ronit Dinovitzer, Section of Sociology of Law Business Meeting

Patricia Louie, Mapping Multiracial vs. Monoracial Heath Disparities

Elliot Fonarev, Using Legal Cases as Ethnographic Objects to Assess Gender Identity Making in Human Rights Law

Kim Pernell (with Jiwook Jung of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Rethinking Moral Hazard: Competing Drivers of Bank Risk-Taking, 1993-2015

Steve G. Hoffman, Other Realities: Using Simulation in Disaster and Emergency Management to Create and Recreate Worlds

Jooyoung Kim Lee, Microsociologies: Methods & Perspectives on Interaction

Irene Boeckmann, Making Motherhood Work: How Women Manage Careers and Caregiving (Princeton University Press, 2019) by Caitlyn Colins

Ronit Dinovitzer and Andreea Mogosanu, Understanding the Motherhood Penalty Among Private Sector Lawyers: The Effects of Entrenched Masculinity

Ron Levi and Ioana Sendroiu, Partnership Patterns, Performances, and the Spread of Human Rights

Monday, August 10th

Chris M. Smith, Racializing Police Violence

Angelina Grigoryeva (with Nina Bandelj of University of California-Irvine), The Price of Parenting: Wealth, Race and Financial Activities for Children, 1998-2016

Jonathan Horowitz (with Jill Hamm and Kerrylin Lambert of UNC-Chapel Hill), The Price of Parenting: Wealth, Race and Financial Activities for Children, 1998-2016

Fedor A. Dokshin and Mircea Gherghina, Green in the Wallet: Political Identity, Financial Incentives, and the Diffusion of Residential Solar Photovoltaics

Joshua Harold, The Holocaust, Israel, and the Everyday Politics of Collective Memory Mobilization

David Nicholas Pettinicchio, Past, Present, and Future: 30 Years After the Americans with Disabilities Act

Kim de Laat, Valuations of Diversity: Exploring the Socio-Economic Role of Marquee Quotas in Creative Industries

Tuesday, August 11th

Kristin Plys, For a Rodneyan World Systems Analysis: Returning to the Dar es Salaam School

Kim de Laat, Barriers to Flexible Work Arrangements: New Evidence on the Role of Work Culture and Structure

Ali Greey, Preclusive Portals: The Spatial Stakes of “Determining Gender” in Binary-Gendered Restrooms and Locker Rooms

David Nicholas Pettinicchio (with Michelle Lee Maroto of University of Alberta), “Working in the Shadows of Society”: Disability Subminimum Wages and the Reproduction of Inequality

Ann L. Mullen, Beyond Classification, Decoding, and Meaning-Making: Contemporary Artists’ Perspectives on the Reception of Visual Art

Natalie Julia Adamyk, Governing Through Less Governance: Women’s Shelters and the Creation of the “Shelter-Citizen”

Carmen Lamothe, Reframing Public Health Problems: A Qualitative Examination of Public Health Apps in the United States

Michael Hammond, Section on Evolution, Biology, and Society Business Meeting

Kristin Plys, Political Economy of the World System Roundtables, Table 2: Core/Periphery Relations

Marion Blute, On Human Nature: New Approaches in the 21st Century

Sharla N. Alegria, Jobs, Occupations, and Professions

Franklynn Bartol, Sex/Gender in the Brain: Is Neuroplasticity the New Neurodeterminism?

Youngrong Lee, “It is Not Meant to Be Work”: How Do Workers Become Consumers in the Gig Economy?

Jordan Foster, “My Money and My Heart”: Buying a Birkin and Class Boundaries Online

Scott Schieman and Philip James Badawy, Control and the Health Effects of Work-Family Conflict: A Longitudinal Test of Generalized versus Specific Stress-Buffering

Michelle Pannor Silver, Section on Sociology of Consumers and Consumption Roundtables, Table 2: Body and Health

Merin Oleschuk, Expanding the Joys of Cooking: How Class Shapes the Emotional Work of Preparing Family Meals

David Nicholas Pettinicchio, Living on the Poverty Line: Low Wage Work, Precarity, and the New Economy

Noam Keren, A Radical State of Mind: When Radical Social-Movements and States Collide, The Case of 269Life

Angelina Grigoryeva, Theory Section Refereed Roundtables, Table 1: Theorizing Polity and Society-1, Table 2: Theorizing Polity and Society-2, Table 3: Theorizing Violence and Conflict, Table 4: Toward a Theory of Economic Action, Table 5: Theorizing Social Interaction and Self-Presentation, Table 6: Revisting Sociology of Classical Theory, Table 7: Theoretical Foundations of Social Justice and Inequality, Table 8: Novel Theoretical Approaches to Social Life

Christos Orfanidis, Theory Section Refereed Roundtables, Table 5: Theorizing Social Interaction and Self-Presentation

Tahseen Shams, International Migration Roundtables, Table 1: Critical Refugee Studies I, Table 2: Critical Refugee Studies II, Table 3: Citizenship, Multiculturalism, and Nationalism, Table 4: Educational Trajectories and Evolving Demographics, Table 5: Health, Wellness, and Migration, Table 6: Immigration Lawmaking and Political Activism, Table 7: Undocumented Immigration, Table 8: Refugee Resettlement and Community Formation, Table 9: Gendered Approaches to Migration I, Table 10: Gendered Approaches to Migration II, Table 11: Immigrant Workers and the Labor Market I, Table 12: Immigrant Workers and the Labor Market II, Table 13: Comparative Migration Studies, Table 14: Global Migration I, Table 15: Global Migration II

U of T Sociologists at the 2019 ASA

This year, 71 faculty members graduate students from Sociology at the University of Toronto are participating in the Annual Meeting of the American Sociology Association in New York City. In addition to the people presenting papers, a number of our community are also participating as session organizers, discussants or journal editorial panel members. The meetings happen between August 10th and August 13th. We have listed the papers we’re presenting below by the day of the presentation, with student and recent grad presenters shown in italics. Please refer to the ASA Program for complete information.

Saturday, August 10th

Ellen Berrey, U.S. Universities’ Responses to Hate Speech Incidents and Free Speech Politics and the Implications for Inclusion Policy

Yvonne Daoleuxay, The Most Canadian Neighborhood Ever: Social Disciplining and Driving in the Greater Toronto Area

Ethan Fosse and Jason Settels, Population-Level Variability of Happiness Trends in the United States

Chris Kohut, Unanticipated Gains in Homeless Shelters: A Study Examining the Social Networks of the Homeless Population

Ron Levi (with Holly Campeau of U of Alberta and Todd Foglesong of U of T, Munk School), Legality, Recognition, and the Bind of Legal Cynicism: Experiences of Policing During an Unsettled Time

Matthew Parbst, Gender Equality, Family Policy and the Convergence of the Gender Gap in Depression

Kristin Plys, Politics and Poetics in Lahore’s Pak Tea House during the Zia Military Dictatorship (1977-1988)

Markus Schafer (with Matthew Andersson of Baylor University), Looking Homeward with the Life Course: Early Origins of Adulthood Dwelling Satisfaction?

Sunday, August 11th

Philip Badawy and Scott Schieman, When Family Calls: How Gender, Money, and Care Shape the Family Contact and Family-to-Work Conflict Relationship

Irene Boeckman, Work-Family Policies and Working Hours’ Differences Within Couples After Childbirth

Lei Chai and Scott Schieman (with Alex Bierman of U of Calgary) Financial Strain and Psychological Distress: The Mediating Effect of Work-Family Interface

Clayton Childress, Shyon Baumann, Jean-Francois Nault (and Craig M. Rowlings from Duke University), From Omnivore to Snob: The Social Positions of Taste Between and Within Music Genres

Ethan Fosse (with Fabian T. Pfesser of U of Michigan), Bounding Analyses of Mobility Effects

Susila Gurusami, Carceral Complicities: Holding Institutions of Higher Education Accountable for Our Carceral Crises

Julia Ingenfeld, Parents’ Division of Housework and Mothers’ Labor Force Participation: Result of Selection and Assortative Mating?

Jonathan Kauenhowen, Framing Indigeneity: A comparative analysis of Indigenous representation in mainstream and Indigenous newspapers

Yangsook Kim, Doing Care Work in Korea Town: Korean In-Home Supportive Service Workers in Los Angeles

Kim de Laat, De-stigmatizing flexible work arrangements: The promises and pitfalls of buy-in from ideal working fathers

Chang Zhe Lin, Social Capital, Islam, and Labor Force Outcomes: Explaining Labor Force Outcomes among Muslim Immigrants in France

Martin Lukk, Fracturing the Imagined Community: Income Inequality and Ethno-nationalism in Affluent Democracies

David Pettinicchio and Jordan Foster, A Model Who Looks Like Me: Representing Disability in the Fashion Industry

Ashley Rubin, Target Populations or Caught in the Net: How Race and Gender have Structured Prison Reform Efforts Throughout American History and What it Means for Reforming Mass Incarceration

Ioana Sendroiu, Imagination, from Futures to Failures

Sarah Shah, Gendering Religious Reflexivity in Minority Groups: The Case of Pakistani Canadian Muslims

Michelle Pannor Silver, Embodiment and Athletic Identity

Lawrence Williams, How Career Identity Shapes the Meaning of Work for Referred Employees

Dana Wray, The Causal Effect of Paternity Leave on Fathers’ Responsibility for Children

Monday, August 12th

Katelin Albert, “The decision was made for me. I’m okay with that”: HPV Vaccine and Adolescent Girls’ Selves

Monica Boyd and Shawn Perron, The Vietnamese Boat People in Canada: 30 Years Later

Gordon Brett, The Embodied Dimensions of Creativity

Soli Dubash, “My House Is Your House”: Genre Conventions, Myspace Musicians, and Music Genre Self-Identification

M. Omar Faruque, Privatizing Nature: Resource Development and Nationalist Imaginaries in Bangladesh

Fernando A. Calderon Figueroa,Trust thy Neighbour, but Leave Up the Hedges: Trust in the Urban Scene

Vanina Leschziner, The Specter of Schemas: Uncovering the Meanings and Uses of “Schemas” in Sociology

Patricia Louie, Race, Skin Tone and Health Inequality in the U.S.

Neda Maghbouleh, Anti-Muslim Racism and the ‘MENA’ Box: Expulsions and Escapes from Whiteness

Gabriel Menard, Latent Framing Opportunities for Movements and Counter-movements: The US Network Neutrality Debate, 2005-2015

Sebastien Parker, ‘Both roads lead to Rome’: Pathways towards commitment in a far-right organization

Kim Pernell, Imprinting a Risky Logic: Graduate Business Education and Bank Risk-Taking

Sagi Ramaj, The Homeownership Attainment of LGB Immigrants: The Role of Social Relationships

Jeffrey Reitz (with Emily Laxer of York U and Patrick Simon of INED), National immigration ‘models,’ social welfare regimes, and Muslims’ economic incorporation in France and Canada

Ioana Sendroiu and Andreea Mogosanu, Stigma spillover and beyond: Resistance, appropriation, and counter-narratives in stigmatized consumption

Tahseen Shams, The Precariousness of South Asian Muslim Americans: Geopolitics, Islamophobia, and the Model Minority Myth

Lance Stewart, The Judgment of Objects: The Constitution of Affordances through the Perceptual Judgment of Digital Media

Laura Upenieks, Reassembling the Radius: Trust and Marginality across East-Central Europe

Tuesday, August 13th

Milos Brocic, Higher Education and the Development of Moral Foundations

Jerry Flores (with Janelle Hawes of U Washington-Tacoma and Kati Barahona-Lopes of UC, Santa Cruz), What are the challenges of girls in involved in the foster care and juvenile justice system?

Ethan Fosse (with Christopher Winship of Harvard University), Bias Formulas for Mechanism-Based Models: A General Strategy for Estimating Age-Period-Cohort Effects

Angelina Grigoryeva, An Organizational Approach to Financial Risk-Taking: The Role of Firm Compensation Plans

Cinthya J. Guzman, Rethinking Boredom in (Inter)action

Andrew Nevin, Cyber-Psychopathy Revisited: An Alternative Framework for Explaining Online Deviance

Laila Omar, “What would my future be?”: Conceptualization of the “future” among Syrian newcomer mothers in Canada

Natalia Otto, The violent art of making do: Gendered narratives of criminalized girls in Southern Brazil

Laura Upenieks and Ron Levi (with John Hagan of Northwestern University), The Palliative Function of Legality Beliefs on Mental Health

 

 

Dr. Michelle Pannor Silver interviewed in “University Affairs” for her book release

Silver, MichelleUniversity Affairs recently published an interview with Professor Michelle Pannor Silver regarding her new book, Retirement and its Discontents: Why We Won’t Stop Working, Even if We Can. In an attempt to better understand why people in high performance careers perceived retirement as difficulty rather than reprieve, Dr. Silver interviewed doctors, CEOs, athletes, professors, and homemakers in the midst of their transitions into retirement. In the interview, she discusses topics such as the influences behind her work, and its implications within academia on both a personal and institutional level.

Dr.  Silver is an Assistant Professor of Sociology with teaching duties at the UTSC campus, and the Interdisciplinary Centre for Health and Society. Her professional interests include gerontology, aging and the life course, retirement and health care expenditures. More specifically, her research interests include health economics, health informatics, health policy, and health services research.

The full article can be viewed here. We have posted an excerpt below.

UA: How does academia inform perceptions about boundaries between work and life outside of work?

Dr. Silver: Academia is a great example of a line of work where those boundaries between work and life get blurred. There’s an expectation that you’re always thinking about work. Some of it is very deadline-oriented, like grant deadlines are very hard rules and if you miss it by a minute, you’re out, your application will not be looked at. But then there’s other aspects of it like writing and producing articles where the pressure is on you to accept those internal deadlines. To be really successful at it, you have to always be on, always be receptive to getting ideas anywhere.

On the other hand, academics are also a great example of people who can potentially be very successful in retirement. Many of the non-academic retirees I interviewed said “I don’t even know what to do, every day is a weekend.” They didn’t know how to structure their time. But academics do, they have to run a class and coordinate with TAs and all of that. Academics are quite well suited to retirement if they put the skills that they’ve been developing in their work to use for their own personal life.

Read the full story.

“Each of us May Have 2 Ages”: Dr. Michelle Pannor Silver Interviewed in Global News

Silver, MichelleDr. Michelle Pannor Silver was interviewed by Global News for her thoughts on how people can have a biological age that differs from their actual age. On top of physical health risks, she states that if someone’s biological age is greater than their actual age, it can affect their mental well-being, too. Factors like genetics, living environment, your lifestyle, diet and exercise habits all play a part in how people age. In addition, she points out that stress also impacts aging, as chronic stress can lead to an increased risk of disease and mental health issues.

Dr.  Silver is an Assistant Professor of Sociology and the Interdisciplinary Centre for Health and Society. Her professional interests include gerontology, aging and the life course, retirement and health care expenditures. More specifically, her research interests include health economics, health informatics, health policy, and health services research.

The full article can be viewed here. We have posted an excerpt below.

What affects how you age?

So if the key to living longer is a lower biological age, what factors affect your ability to hold onto youth?

Silver said factors like genetics, the environment in which you live, your lifestyle, diet and exercise habits all play a part in how you age. She pointed out that stress also impacts aging, as chronic stress can lead to an increased risk of disease and mental health issues.

“To be physically active and socially engaged at later stages in the life course can affect how we age,” Silver added.

How to “slow down” aging

The good thing about biological age is that it can often be changed.

“Lifestyle definitely plays a role in aging,” Silver said. “Factors like what you eat and how often you move on a daily or even hourly basis matter at every stage of the life course.”

Silver acknowledged that the older we get, the more challenging movement can be. Despite this, she said people should create opportunities to be physically active to whatever extent is possible.

Professor Michelle Pannor Silver on the Discontentments of Retirement in New Forbes Interview

Silver, MichelleProfessor Michelle Pannor Silver has recently been interviewed by Forbes Magazine on her book Retirement and Its Discontents: unfulfilling, rudderless and filled with a loss of identity, which focuses on the realities of retirement from a sociological perspective. Her book delves into the world of retired professionals who have found the transition to retirement challenging. She found that they often felt forced into retirement by family, friends and colleague members.

Michelle Pannor Silver is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto Scarborough Campus with joint appointments in the Department of Sociology and the Interdisciplinary Centre for Health and Society (ICHS).  She also holds cross appointments at the Institute for Life Course and Aging and in the Department of Medicine. Her professional interests  include Gerontology, aging and the life course, retirement, pensions, health care expenditures, health information seeking behaviours and perceptions about aging.

The full article can be viewed here. We have posted an except below.

 

You asked what their retirement parties were like. Why? And what did you learn from that?

When I started talking with people about what marked their retirement turning point, they often pointed to the party leading up to it. One man, an academic physician, described it as being more like a funeral; he felt like he was sitting there and people were talking about him as if he had died and it was the end of his life.

He realized he had a lot of things he was still working on, if not his best work still to come. And he decided to focus on doing the research he sought to be his life’s work. The party sealed the deal.

He would tell me: ‘I’m retired and have a set of historical fiction novels I’ve always meant to read and I’m interested in.’ He’d try to pick up one of the books that was supposed to be for fun and just couldn’t do it. He’d immediately gravitate to the medical journals that were work-related.

 

Retirement and its Discontents: New Book by Professor Michelle Pannor Silver

Why do people avoid retiring?

Professor Michelle Pannor Silver has recently published a new book “Retirement and its Discontents: Why We Won’t Stop Working, Even if We Can” that seeks to understand why people with highly accomplished careers  resist retirement or are unhappy when they do retire. Silver is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto Scarborough with joint appointments in the Department of Sociology and the Interdisciplinary Centre for Health and Society (ICHS).

You can listen to Michelle speak about her new book here on the New Books Network podcast.

The publisher has this to say about her book:

In the popular imagination, retirement promises a well-deserved rest—idle days spent traveling, volunteering, pursuing hobbies, or just puttering around the house. But as the nature of work has changed, becoming not just a means of income but a major source of personal identity, many accomplished professionals struggle with discontentment in their retirement. What are we to do—individually and as a culture—when work and life experience make conventional retirement a burden rather than a reprieve?

In Retirement and Its Discontents, Michelle Pannor Silver considers how we confront the mismatch between idealized and actual retirement. She follows doctors, CEOs, elite athletes, professors, and homemakers during their transition to retirement as they struggle to recalibrate their sense of purpose and self-worth. The work ethic and passion that helped these retirees succeed can make giving in to retirement more difficult, as they confront newfound leisure time with uncertainty and guilt. Drawing on in-depth interviews that capture a range of perceptions and common concerns about what it means to be retired, Silver emphasizes the significance of creating new retirement strategies that support social connectedness and personal fulfillment while countering ageist stereotypes about productivity and employment. A richly detailed and deeply personal exploration of the challenges faced by accomplished retirees, Retirement and Its Discontents demonstrates the importance of personal identity in forging sustainable social norms around retirement and helps us to rethink some of the new challenges for aging societies.