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Recent PhD graduate, Anelyse Weiler, to begin tenure track position at the University of Victoria

PhD Candidate Anelyse Weiler will be joining the University of Victoria’s Department of Sociology as an Assistant Professor. Before her new position begins in July, she will be defending her dissertation on 12 June. Supervised by Josée Johnston with committee members Hannah Wittman (UBC) and Jennifer Chun, her dissertation is entitled, The Periphery in the … Read More

Recent Phd Graduate Merin Oleschuk to begin Tenure Track position at University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Recent PhD recipient, Merin Oleschuk will begin a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in Human Development and Family Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Merin graduated on January 10, 2020. Her dissertation is entitled, Domestic Foodwork in Value and Practice: A Study of Food, Inequality and Health in Family Life and she completed it … Read More

Congratulations to Taylor Price, one of 25 finalists in SSHRC Storytellers Contest

Congratulations to PhD Candidate Taylor Price who recently learned that his submission to the SSHRC Storytellers Competition has been named one of the finalists for 2021. The annual SSHRC Storytellers Competition provides a venue for post-secondary students to showcase their SSHRC-funded research by presenting a 3 minute video or audoclip. The top 25 candidates receive … Read More

Professor Cynthia Cranford: Pandemic exposes deep flaws in Canadian home care system

The UTM Research News has recently published an interview with Professor Cynthia Cranford about care work during the pandemic. Professor Cranford is an Associate Professor of Sociology with undergraduate teaching responsibilities at the Mississauga campus. Her research focuses on inequalities of gender, work and migration, and collective efforts to resist them. We have posted an … Read More

Professor Melissa Milkie on ‘The pressure cooker’ of working from home and homeschooling

The UTM Research News recently published an interview with Professor Melissa Milkie about the difficulties of balancing work and family life. Professor Milkie is a Full Professor of Sociology and Chair of the Tri-Campus Graduate Department. Her research studies gender & family, the work-family interface, culture, and mental health. We have posted an excerpt of … Read More

Sociology students build grassroots volunteer-run initiative to help those in need during COVID-19 pandemic

In the earliest days of the COVID outbreak, a small collective of people working to support QT/BIPOC (queer and trans, Black and Indigenous People of Colour) communities put out a call through the Caremongering – Toronto Facebook page for other groups to come together and replicate the mutual aid model. Sociology PhD students Andrea Román … Read More

Professor Joe Hermer on the impact of COVID-19 on the Homeless in Ontario

Professor Joe Hermer has recently co-authored an article in The Conversation discussing the need to protect the homeless during the pandemic. The article warns that police enforcing Ontario’s Safe Streets Act that targets homeless people will put them in danger, not only with the law, but also risk spreading the pandemic. Professor Hermer is an … Read More

Sociology Research Contributes to Lessening the Impact of COVID-19

Many of the Faculty in the Sociology Department have recently adjusted their research to address issues arising as a result of COVID-19 as well as the social distancing and economic shutdown that have been put in place to contain the pandemic. Four sociology faculty members have recently had their projects funded by the Toronto COVID-19 … Read More

PhD Candidate Gordon Brett and Professor Vanina Leschziner on “Cognitive, Embodied, and Evaluative Processes in Creativity”

Ph.D. Candidate Gordon Brett and Professor Vanina Leschziner recently co-authored an article in Social Psychology Quarterly, entitled, “Beyond Two Minds: Cognitive, Embodied, and Evaluative Processes in Creativity”. The article demonstrates that creativity is grounded in both bodily and sensory experience, and is more reliant on a combination of cognitive processes than has been recognized. One of … Read More

Professor David Pettinicchio on the impact of covid-19 on people with disabilities

Professor David Pettinicchio has recently spoken to the media about how COVID-19 can exacerbate existing inequalities. A story by UTM’s Research Communications Office highlights his insights. We have included an excerpt of the story below. The full story is available on the UTM website here. Professor Pettinicchio is an Assistant Professor of Sociology with undergraduate … Read More

Congratulations to Professor Josée Johnston, the 2020 recipient of the Jeanette Wright Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Mentorship

The Department of Sociology is pleased to announce that Josée Johnston has been awarded the 2020 Jeanette Wright Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Mentorship. The award is “offered to a current faculty member in the Department of Sociology who has demonstrated excellence in mentoring of sociology graduate students” and who is “active in supervising … Read More

Professor Joe Hermer writes on Homelessness in the UK for the Crisis Blog.

Professor Joe Hermer recently published an article entitled, “Thomas Parker and the Tragedy of Vagrancy Law” for the Crisis Blog, an online publication produced by a national charity in the UK that works to reduce homelessness in England, Scotland and Wales. Professor Hermer’s article outlines the history of Britain’s Vagrancy Act of 1935 and its … Read More

Congratulations to Andrew Nevin, recipient of the 2020 Dennis William Magill Canada Research Award

Congratulations to Andrew Nevin, winner of the 2020 Dennis William Magill Canada Research Award. The award is awarded annually for a paper or dissertation of exceptional merit that deals with a sociological aspect of Canadian Society. Preference is given for work that deals with macro-sociological topics. Nevin received the award for his paper, “Academic Hiring … Read More

PhD Candidate Merin Oleshuk, in collaboration with Professors Josée Johnston and Shyon Baumann, on “Maintaining Meat: Cultural Repertoires and the Meat Paradox in a Diverse Socio-Cultural Context”

PhD Candidate Merin Oleshuk, in collaboration with Professors Josée Johnston and Shyon Baumann,  published an article in Sociological Forum, entitled “Maintaining Meat: Cultural Repertoires and the Meat Paradox in a Diverse Socio-Cultural Context.” This article examines Canadian meat eaters and vegetarians within the context of “cultural repertoires” regarding meat eating. The authors distinguish between two … Read More

PhD student Natália Otto on “‘I Did What I Had to Do’: Loyalty and Sacrifice in Girls’ Narratives of Homicide in Southern Brazil”

Ph.D. student Natália Otto recently published an article, entitled, “‘I Did What I Had to Do’: Loyalty and Sacrifice in Girls’ Narratives of Homicide in Southern Brazil” in The British Journal of Criminology. The article investigates the ways in which women reconcile their gendered identities with the act of killing. Otto sheds light on women’s … Read More

Ph.D. Candidate Taylor Price on “Posthumous Consecration in Rock’s Legitimating Discourse”

Ph.D. candidate Taylor Price published an article in Poetics, entitled “Posthumous Consecration in Rock’s Legitimating Discourse.” The article advances the idea of posthumous consecration and analyzes lifetime and posthumous rock album reviews. His findings demonstrate that “death plays a critical role in how cultural fields achieve autonomy.” Price reveals that critics emphasize the coherence of … Read More

Ph.D. Candidate Laila Omar, on “Listening in Arabic”

Ph.D. candidate Laila Omar co-authored and published an article in Meridian, entitled “Listening in Arabic: Feminist Research with Syrian Refugee Mothers”. The article takes a feminist approach to research and is highly conscious of the unequal relations between women at the intersection of class, race, citizenship status as well as several other categories that represent asymmetrical … Read More

Ph.D. Candidate Andrew Nevin on, “Technological Tethering, Digital Natives, and Challenges in the Work–Family Interface”

Ph.D. candidate Andrew Nevin and Professor Scott Schieman recently published a co-authored article in The Sociological Quarterly, entitled, “Technological Tethering, Digital Natives, and Challenges in the Work–Family Interface.” The article discusses the phenomenon of “constant connectivity” and the ways in which it has fostered unrealistic expectations of worker availability. The authors explore the conflict that occurs … Read More

Ph.D. Candidate Anson Au discusses Hong Kong’s economy and the recent protests in the South China Morning

Ph.D. Candidate Anson Au recently wrote an Opinion piece for South China Morning, entitled, “Why Hong Kong’s economy is more than capable of weathering the recent protest headwinds.” South China Morning is a Hong Kong English-language newspaper founded in 1903. In the article, Au uses economic data and data from his research with Professor Sida … Read More

PhD Candidate James Lannigan on “Examining government cross-platform engagement in social media”

Ph.D. Candidate James Lannigan, in collaboration with Professor Anatoily Gruzd and Professor Kevin Quigley, published an article entitled, “Examining government cross-platform engagement in social media: Instagram vs Twitter and the big lift project” in Government Information Quarterly. The article compares the use of Instagram and Twitter by Halifax Harbour Bridges (HHB) to engage the public around the … Read More